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Rumbough History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The name Rumbough is tied to the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of England. It comes from Rumbald, an Old German personal name. This name came to England in the wake of the Norman Conquest in 1066, as King William encouraged the immigration from continental Europe of skilled tradesmen and artisans; many of these immigrants came from Germany. Saint Rumwold (Rumbold) was a medieval infant saint in England, said to have lived for three days in 662. He is said to have been full of Christian piety despite his young age, and able to speak from the moment of his birth, requested baptism, and delivered a sermon prior to his early death. Another Saint Rumbold (Rumold, Romuold) (died 775) was an Irish or Scottish Christian missionary who was martyred near Mechelen by two men, whom he had denounced for their evil ways. St. Rumbold's Cathedral is found in Mechelen, Belgium and it is here that his remains are generally thought to be buried.


Early Origins of the Rumbough family


The surname Rumbough was first found in Sussex at Rumbold's-Wyke (St. Rumbald), also named Rumboldswyke, a parish, in the union of West Hampnett, hundred of Box and Stockbridge, rape of Chichester. St Mary's Church, on Whyke Road, an 11th century church can still be found here and is in good repair.

Early History of the Rumbough family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Rumbough research.
Another 92 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1207, 1622, 1685, 1685, 1613, 1667, 1617, 1690, 1689, 1662 and 1671 are included under the topic Early Rumbough History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Rumbough Spelling Variations


Only recently has spelling become standardized in the English language. As the English language evolved in the Middle Ages, the spelling of names changed also. The name Rumbough has undergone many spelling variations, including Rumbold, Rumbald, Rumble, Rumball, Rumbow and others.

Early Notables of the Rumbough family (pre 1700)


Distinguished members of the family include Richard Rumbold (1622-1685), a Cromwellian soldier who took part in the Rye House Plot to assassinate King Charles II of England. In May 1685 Rumbold joined the Earl of Argyll in his expedition to Scotland. He became separated from the rest of the rebels in their disorderly marches, and was captured. As he was severely wounded, the Scottish government had him tried at once, lest he should escape his punishment by death. He was tried on 26 June, protested his innocence of any design to assassinate...
Another 90 words (6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Rumbough Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Rumbough family to the New World and Oceana


To escape the unstable social climate in England of this time, many families boarded ships for the New World with the hope of finding land, opportunity, and greater religious and political freedom. Although the voyages were expensive, crowded, and difficult, those families that arrived often found greater opportunities and freedoms than they could have experienced at home. Many of those families went on to make significant contributions to the rapidly developing colonies in which they settled. Early North American records indicate many people bearing the name Rumbough were among those contributors: John Rumball who settled in Virginia in 1652; Thomas Rumball settled in Boston Massachusetts in 1635; James Rumbelow settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1880.

Contemporary Notables of the name Rumbough (post 1700)


  • Stanley Maddox Rumbough Jr. (1920-2017), American businessman and politician, special assistant to the White House where he helped organize the Executive Branch Liaison Office; his mother was great-granddaughter of William Colgate co-founder of Colgate-Palmolive
  • Major-General William Samuel Rumbough (1892-1980), American Chief Signal Officer US European Theater of Operations (1942-1945) [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Generals of World War II. (Retrieved 2014, March 26) William Rumbough. Retrieved from http://generals.dk/general/Rumbough/William_Samuel/USA.html
  • Brigadier-General David Sheridan Rumbough (1894-1962), American Chairman of Panama Canal Subcommittee, Common Factory & Service Munitions Board (1949-1950) [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Generals of World War II. (Retrieved 2014, March 26) David Rumbough. Retrieved from http://generals.dk/general/Rumbough/David_Sheridan/USA.html

The Rumbough Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Virtutis laus actio
Motto Translation: The praise of virtue is action.


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Citations


  1. ^ Generals of World War II. (Retrieved 2014, March 26) William Rumbough. Retrieved from http://generals.dk/general/Rumbough/William_Samuel/USA.html
  2. ^ Generals of World War II. (Retrieved 2014, March 26) David Rumbough. Retrieved from http://generals.dk/general/Rumbough/David_Sheridan/USA.html


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