Ovarth History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Ovarth is a name of ancient Anglo-Saxon origin and comes from a family once having lived in or near the settlement of Haworth in the West Riding of Yorkshire. Hayward's Heath in Sussex is another possible origin of the name. The surname Ovarth belongs to the large category of Anglo-Saxon habitation names, which are derived from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads.

Early Origins of the Ovarth family

The surname Ovarth was first found in the West Riding of Yorkshire at Haworth, a chapelry, in the parish of Bradford, union of Keighley, wapentake of Morleywhich. [1] Historically part of Lancashire, the village dates back to 1209 when it was originally listed as Hauewrth. Literally the place name means "enclosure with a hedge," from the Old English words "haga" + "worth." [2]

One of the first records of the family was Robert de Hawrth who was listed in the Pipe Rolls for Yorkshire in 1200. [3]

Later the Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 listed Alicia de Haworth; Johannes Haueworth; Johannes de Haworth; and Otes de Haworth as all holding lands there at that time. [4]

"The Haworths or Howarths are very characteristic of Lancashire, Howorth being of less frequent occurrence. The Haworths of Great Haworth, a very old gentle family, have resided in that place for many centuries; the Haworths of Higher Croft branched off from them in the middle of the 17th century; whilst those of Sale in Cheshire belong to a still later branch. Haworth was a common Rochdale name in the 16th century. Abraham Hawarth was a Manchester boroughreeve in 1746. Haworth is a place or a seat in the county, but I scarcely think that this is a sufficient explanation of the frequency of a name which, in one form or another, is borne by nearly one in every hundred of Lancashire men." [5]

Early History of the Ovarth family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Ovarth research. Another 103 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1609, 1629, 1639, 1616, 1683, 1676, 1679, 1680, 1683, 1767, 1833, 1767, 1793, 1797, 1812, 1817, 1798, 1802 and 1806 are included under the topic Early Ovarth History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ovarth Spelling Variations

The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries; therefore, spelling variations are common among early Anglo-Saxon names. As the form of the English language changed, even the spelling of literate people's names evolved. Ovarth has been recorded under many different variations, including Haworth, Howarth and others.

Early Notables of the Ovarth family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include Samuel Haworth ( fl. 1683), an empiric, a native of Hertfordshire, and probably the son of William Haworth, who wrote against the Hertford Quakers (1676). In 1679 he was a 'student of physic' living next door to the Dolphin in Sighs Lane, and dealing in quack tablets and a tincture. He was patronised by the Duke of York (James II), and admitted an extra-licentiate of the College of Physicians on 12 Oct. 1680. His new way of curing consumption was brought to the notice of Charles II, who ordered him to test it on a case...
Another 182 words (13 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Ovarth Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Ovarth family

For many English families, the political and religious disarray that shrouded England made the far away New World an attractive prospect. On cramped disease-ridden ships, thousands migrated to those British colonies that would eventually become Canada and the United States. Those hardy settlers that survived the journey often went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Ovarth or a variant listed above: John Haworth settled in New York in 1820; James, John, and Richard Haworth arrived in Philadelphia between 1820 and 1860; Thomas Howarth settled in Maryland in 1699.



The Ovarth Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Quod ero spero
Motto Translation: I hope that I shall be.


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  3. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  4. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  5. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.


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