Oats History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The distinguished surname Oats emerged among the industrious people of Flanders, which was an important trading partner and political ally of Britain during the Middle Ages. As a result of the frequent commercial intercourse between the Flemish and English nations, many Flemish migrants settled in Britain. In early times, people were known by only a single name. However, as the population grew and people traveled further afield, it became increasingly necessary to assume an additional name to differentiate between bearers of the same personal name. One of the most common classes of surname is the patronymic surname, which was usually derived from the first name of the person's father. Flemish surnames of this type are often characterized by the diminutive suffix -kin, which became very frequent in England during the 14th century. The surname Oats is derived from the Old French personal names Odes, Otes, Odon, and Otton. These are all derived from the Old German names Odo and Otto, which literally mean riches. Occasionally, the name Oats is a local surname derived from the settlement of Ott in Belgium.

Early Origins of the Oats family

The surname Oats was first found in Cornwall where they held a family seat from early times and their first records appeared on the census rolls taken by the ancient Kings of Britain to determine the rate of taxation of their subjects.

Early History of the Oats family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Oats research. Another 159 words (11 lines of text) covering the years 1160, 1177, 1213, 1275, 1275, 1649 and 1705 are included under the topic Early Oats History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Oats Spelling Variations

Flemish surnames are characterized by a large number of spelling variations. One reason for this is that medieval English lacked definite spelling rules. The spellings of surnames were also influenced by the official court languages, which were French and Latin. Names were rarely spelled consistently in medieval times. Scribes and church officials recorded names as they sounded, rather than adhering to specific spelling rules, and people often had their names registered in several different forms throughout their lives. One of the greatest reasons for change is the linguistic uniqueness of the Flemish settlers in England, who spoke a language closely related to Dutch. The pronunciation and spelling of Flemish names were often altered to suit the tastes of English-speaking people. In many cases, the first, final, or middle syllables of surnames were eliminated. The name has been spelled Oates, Oats, Otes, Otis, Oaten, Otten, Oadt, Otton, Oton and many more.

Early Notables of the Oats family (pre 1700)

Another 40 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Oats Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Oats family to Ireland

Some of the Oats family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. More information about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Oats migration to the United States +

An examination into the immigration and passenger lists has discovered a number of people bearing the name Oats:

Oats Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Samuel Oats, who landed in Virginia in 1721 [1]
Oats Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Patrick Oats, aged 26, who landed in New York in 1812 [1]
  • Polly Oats, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1812 [1]
  • Mr. Charles Oats, (b. 1808), aged 40, Cornish carpenter departing from Penzance aboard the ship "Cornwall" arriving in the United States on 18th October 1848 [2]
  • William Oats, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1851 [1]
  • Mr. Christopher Oats, (b. 1831), aged 26, Cornish miner departing from Liverpool aboard the ship "Cultivator" arriving in New York, USA on 12 September 1857 [2]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Oats Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Herbert C. C Oats, aged 35, who settled in America from Manchester, in 1904
  • Lillian Oats, aged 32, who settled in America from Cornwall, in 1906
  • Mary Elizabeth Oats, aged 31, who landed in America from Redmuth, in 1907
  • Augustus Oats, aged 27, who landed in America from Marazion, England, in 1908
  • Wilfred Oats, aged 25, who settled in America from St. Just, England, in 1909
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Australia Oats migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Oats Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Azariah Oats, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Britannia" in 1846 [3]
  • Richard Oats, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Baboo" in 1848 [4]
  • Elizabeth Oats, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Macedon" in 1849 [5]
  • John Oats, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Macedon" in 1849 [5]
  • Mary Oats, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Macedon" in 1849 [5]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Oats migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Oats Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Thomas Oats, (b. 1852), aged 23, Cornish farm labourer departing on 11th July 1875 aboard the ship "British Empire" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 7th October 1875 [6]
  • Miss Anne Oats, (b. 1876), aged 1 year 6 months, Cornish settler departing on 29th September 1877 aboard the ship "Renfrewshire" going to Hawkes Bay, New Zealand arriving in port on 4th January 1878 [7]
  • Miss Elizabeth Jane Oats, (b. 1870), aged 7, Cornish settler departing on 29th September 1877 aboard the ship "Renfrewshire" going to Hawkes Bay, New Zealand arriving in port on 4th January 1878 [7]
  • Mr. James Oats, (b. 1845), aged 32, Cornish farm Labourer departing on 29th September 1877 aboard the ship "Renfrewshire" going to Hawkes Bay, New Zealand arriving in port on 4th January 1878 [7]
  • Mr. John Oats, (b. 1877), aged 3 months, Cornish settler departing on 29th September 1877 aboard the ship "Renfrewshire" going to Hawkes Bay, New Zealand arriving in port on 4th January 1878 [7]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

West Indies Oats migration to West Indies +

The British first settled the British West Indies around 1604. They made many attempts but failed in some to establish settlements on the Islands including Saint Lucia and Grenada. By 1627 they had managed to establish settlements on St. Kitts (St. Christopher) and Barbados, but by 1641 the Spanish had moved in and destroyed some of these including those at Providence Island. The British continued to expand the settlements including setting the First Federation in the British West Indies by 1674; some of the islands include Barbados, Bermuda, Cayman Island, Turks and Caicos, Jamaica and Belize then known as British Honduras. By the 1960's many of the islands became independent after the West Indies Federation which existed from 1958 to 1962 failed due to internal political conflicts. After this a number of Eastern Caribbean islands formed a free association. [8]
Oats Settlers in West Indies in the 17th Century
  • George Oats, his wife Hannah and children, who settled in Barbados in 1679


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, April 30). Emigrants to New York 1820 - 1891 [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_new_york_1820_1891.pdf
  3. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) BRITANNIA 1846. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1846Britannia.htm
  4. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) BABOO 1848. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1848Baboo.htm
  5. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) The MACEDON 1849. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1849Macedon.htm
  6. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, April 30). Emigrants to Auckland 1872-80 [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/new_zealand_assisted.pdf
  7. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, April 30). Emigrants to other ports, 1872 - 84 [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/new_zealand_assisted.pdf
  8. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_West_Indies


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