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Newtome History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The name Newtome was brought to England in the wave of migration that followed the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Newtome family lived in Cheshire, at Newton. The surname Newtome was originally derived from the Old English words, neowe, meaning new, and tun, meaning enclosure or settlement.

Early Origins of the Newtome family


The surname Newtome was first found in Cheshire at Wilmslow, a parish, in the union of Altrincham, hundred of Macclesfield. "In the north chapel [of Wilmslow church] are two altar-tombs sunk in the wall, on which are figures representing the Newtons of Newton and Pownall." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
We must take a moment to explore the hamlet of Woolsthorpe in Lincolnshire. "This is an ancient hamlet, consisting of a few farmhouses and thatched cottages, with the old manor-house, in which the immortal Sir Isaac Newton was born, on Christmas-day, 1642. His father, John Newton, Esq., was lord of the manor. Great care is taken for the preservation of the house; and when it was repaired, in 1798, a tablet of white marble, commemorating the philosopher's birth, was put up in the chamber where the event took place." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Early History of the Newtome family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Newtome research.
Another 317 words (23 lines of text) covering the years 1166, 1374, 1543, 1661, 1626, 1699, 1660, 1642 and 1727 are included under the topic Early Newtome History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Newtome Spelling Variations


Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence in the eras before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate regularly changed the spellings of their names as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name Newtome have been found, including Newton, Newdon and others.

Early Notables of the Newtome family (pre 1700)


Another 48 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Newtome Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Newtome family to Ireland


Some of the Newtome family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. More information about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Newtome family to the New World and Oceana


For many English families, the social climate in England was oppressive and lacked opportunity for change. For such families, the shores of Ireland, Australia, and the New World beckoned. They left their homeland at great expense in ships that were overcrowded and full of disease. Many arrived after the long voyage sick, starving, and without a penny. But even those were greeted with greater opportunity than they could have experienced back home. Numerous English settlers who arrived in the United States and Canada at this time went on to make important contributions to the developing cultures of those countries. Many of those families went on to make significant contributions to the rapidly developing colonies in which they settled. Early North American records indicate many people bearing the name Newtome were among those contributors: Helen Newton, who came to Virginia in 1621; Francis Newton who settled in Virginia in 1635; Richard Newton who came to Virginia in 1635; Samuel Newton and his servants, who arrived in Barbados in 1680.

The Newtome Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Huic habeo non tibi
Motto Translation: I hold it for him, not for thee.


Newtome Family Crest Products



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Citations


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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