Newborough History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Norman Conquest of England in 1066 brought much change to the island nation, including many immigrants with new names. Among these immigrants were the ancestors of the Newborough family, who lived in Neufbourg, Normandy. "Henry de Newburgh (so named from the castle of Neufbourg, where he was born) was the younger son of Roger de Bellomont Earl of Mellent, and the brother of Robert, afterwards Earl of Leicester. He himself obtained the Earldom of Warwick towards the latter end of the Conqueror's reign, ' when,' says Dugdale, 'King William, having begirt Warwick with a mighty ditch, for the precinct of its walls, and erected the gates at his own charge, did promote this Henry to the earldom, and annexed thereto the royalty of the borough, which at that time belonged to the crown.' Here, 'upon the site of the tower illustrated by the traditions of Guy, the great opponent of the Danes,' he built his castle, which, enlarged and strengthened during the long succession of its powerful lords, became one of the most renowned of English fortresses, and remains 'the glory of the Midland shires. ' William Rufus further bestowed upon him all the lands that had belonged to his Saxon predecessor Thurkill, whose daughter and heir Margaret, Leland tells us, he had married. " [1]

Newbrough in Northumberland, derives its name from the family and in turn, that is derived from the Old English words niwe, meaning "new," and burh, meaning "fortification." [2]

Early Origins of the Newborough family

The surname Newborough was first found in Warwickshire. It is generally thought that the "founder of this family was Henry de Newburgh, so called from the castle of that name in Normandy, a younger son of Roger de Bellomonte, Earl of Mellent. He came in [to England] with the Conqueror, and was created Earl of Warwick. " [3]

Berkely in Somerset was one of the original family seats. "This place appears to have formed part of the possessions of the Newborough family, who were relatives to, and came over to England with, William the Conqueror, and one of whose descendants, Thomas Newborough, was interred in the church in 1531." [4]

From this early record , the family quickly scattered. Bindon Abbey, in the parish of East Stoke, Dorset was founded in 1172, by Robert de Newburgh and Maud his wife, who endowed it for monks of the Cistercian order; it was dedicated to St. Mary. [4]

Winfrith-Newburgh, again in Dorset was a large holding of the family in ancient times. "This is a very extensive and ancient parish, giving name to the hundred. It formerly belonged to the family of Newburgh, who had a seat here, of which there are no traces." [4]

A tone time East Lullworth in Dorset was "at a very early period, in the possession of the De Lolleworths, and subsequently of the Newburghs, who succeeded to the property in the reign of Edward I." [4] (the family inherited East Lullworth and gave it up during the reign of Edward I. In the 16th and 17th century this parish would pass to the Howards and then to the Weld family.)

"Wellesbourn [in Warwickshire] was given by the Conqueror to Henry de Newburg, and was afterwards granted, as is supposed, by one of the Norman earls of Warwick to Robert de Hasting." [4]

Early History of the Newborough family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Newborough research. Another 104 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 126 and 1267 are included under the topic Early Newborough History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Newborough Spelling Variations

Before the last few hundred years the English language had no fixed system of spelling rules. For that reason, spelling variations occurred commonly in Anglo Norman surnames. Over the years, many variations of the name Newborough were recorded, including Newborough, Newburgh and others.

Early Notables of the Newborough family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Newborough Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Newborough migration to the United States +

The unstable environment in England at this time caused numerous families to board ships and leave in search of opportunity and freedom from persecution abroad in places like Ireland, Australia, and particularly the New World. The voyage was extremely difficult, however, and only taken at great expense. The cramped conditions and unsanitary nature of the vessels caused many to arrive diseased and starving, not to mention destitute from the enormous cost. Still opportunity in the emerging nations of Canada and the United States was far greater than at home and many went on to make important contributions to the cultures of their adopted countries. An examination of many early immigration records reveals that people bearing the name Newborough arrived in North America very early:

Newborough Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Grace Newborough, aged 39, originally from London, England, arrived in New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Caronia" from Liverpool, England [5]

Contemporary Notables of the name Newborough (post 1700) +

  • Mr. David Grahame Newborough O.B.E. (b. 1961), British Chair of the National Skills Academy for Power Strategy Group, was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire on 29th December 2018 For services to Skills in the Energy and Utility Sector [6]


  1. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 2 of 3
  2. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  3. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  4. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  5. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6WG-9M5 : 6 December 2014), Grace Newborough, 19 Aug 1919; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York, ship name Caronia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  6. ^ "Birthday and New Year Honours Lists (1940 to 2019)." Issue 62507, 28 December 2018 | London Gazette, The Gazette, Dec. 2018, www.thegazette.co.uk/honours-lists


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