Mummery History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Mummery is a name that was brought to England by the ancestors of the Mummery family when they migrated to the region after the Norman Conquest in 1066. The Mummery family lived in Northumberland. The name, however, is a reference to the family's place of residence prior to the Norman Conquest of England in 1066, Montbrai, in La Manche, Normandy. [1]

However, another source claims the family claim descent from "the ancient barony of Mowbray, called by Odericus Vitalis Molbraium, [which] was identical with the village of Monbrai, in the canton or Perci, an arrondissement of St. Lo in Normandy." [2]

Early Origins of the Mummery family

The surname Mummery was first found in Northumberland where Geoffrey de Montbray (d. 1093,) Bishop of Coutances was a warrior, administrator and close assistant of William the Conqueror.

After the death of William, Geoffrey settled in Bristol, (as listed in the Domesday Book) where he built a strong castle but frequently feuded with William II." A strong castle was erected [at Thirsk in the North Riding of Yorkshire] about 979 by the family of Mowbray, where Roger de Mowbray in the time of Henry II., having become a confederate of the King of Scotland, erected his standard against his lawful sovereign: upon the suppression of the revolt, this fortress, with many others, was entirely demolished by order of the king." [3]

The same Roger de Mowbray also held Bambrough Castle in Northumberland. "After the Norman Conquest it was held by Robert de Mowbray, on whose insurrection against William Rufus it was besieged, and, after an obstinate defence, surrendered to that monarch, who threatened, unless it were given up, to put out the eyes of Mowbray, who had been taken prisoner." [3]

The markettown and parish of Kirby-Malzeard in the West Riding of Yorkshire was another ancient family seat. "This place was the property of the Mowbray family, afterwards dukes of Norfolk, whose castle here was demolished in the reign of Henry II., and one of whom, John de Mowbray, obtained for the inhabitants in the reign of Edward I. a charter for a weekly market and two annual fairs." [3]

"The Mowbrays used the mulBerry as their rebus. Thomas Duke of Norfolk, at his famous duel with the Duke of Hereford at Coventry, rode a 'horse barded with crimson velvet embroydered with Lions of silver and mulberry trees.' " [4]

Early History of the Mummery family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Mummery research. Another 209 words (15 lines of text) covering the years 1297, 1366, 1399, 1377, 1396, 1444, 1476, 1475, 1225, 1314, 1365, 1399, 1397, 1385, 1405 and 1405 are included under the topic Early Mummery History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Mummery Spelling Variations

Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence in the eras before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate regularly changed the spellings of their names as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name Mummery have been found, including Mowbray, Moubray, Mowbrey, Moubrey and others.

Early Notables of the Mummery family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Thomas Mowbray (1365-1399), an English nobleman, created 1st Duke of Norfolk in 1397, by King Richard II of England; and Thomas de Mowbray (1385-1405), 4th Earl of Norfolk, 2nd Earl of Nottingham, 8th Baron Segrave, 7th Baron Mowbray, English nobleman and rebel, after death of father, allowed to succeed him as Earl of Norfolk and Nottingham. He received his father's...
Another 68 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Mummery Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


New Zealand Mummery migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Mummery Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Charles Mummery, aged 39, a farm labourer, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Lady Nugent" in 1841
  • Mary Mummery, aged 38, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Lady Nugent" in 1841
  • Mary Mummery, aged 20, a servant, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Lady Nugent" in 1841
  • C. Mummery, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Lady Nugent" arriving in Wellington, New Zealand on 17th March 1841 [5]
  • Mr. Thomas Mummery, (b. 1820), aged 38, British labourer travelling from Gravesend aboard the ship "Mystery" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 29th March 1859 [5]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Mummery (post 1700) +

  • Albert Edward Pilkerton "Eddie" Mummery (1897-1937), English professional footballer
  • Albert Frederick Mummery (1855-1895), English mountaineer and author
  • Sir John Frank Mummery DL (b. 1938), British former Lord Justice of Appeal and is President of the Investigatory Powers Tribunal
  • John Howard Mummery CBE, FRCS (1847-1926), British dentist and microscopist
  • Browning Mummery (b. 1961), stage name of Andrew Lonsdale, an Australian electronic musician
  • Joseph Browning Mummery (1888-1974), Australian opera tenor of the 1920s and 1930s


  1. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  2. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  3. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  4. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 2 of 3
  5. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html


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