Monday History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Monday is one of the thousands of new names that the Norman Conquest brought to England in 1066. The Monday family lived in Derbyshire. The name, however, is a reference to the family's place of residence prior to the Norman Conquest of England in 1066, Mundeyville, Normandy where they inhabited the Abbey of Fecamp. [1] [2]

Early Origins of the Monday family

The surname Monday was first found in Derbyshire where "the Mundys of Marheaton, who trace their pedigree to temp. Edward I., have a tradition of Norman descent, from a place called the abbey of Mondaye. " [3]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 proved the scattered migration of the family by that time: Simon Moneday, Huntingdonshire; Simon Mundi, Cambridgeshire; and Henry Mundi, Cambridgeshire. [4] In Somerset, Edmund Moneday, was listed there temp. Edward III. [5]

Further to the south in Cornwall, another branch of the family was found in the manor of Rialton in the hundred of Pyder. "In the days of Elizabeth, a previous compact having expired, Rialton, another manor, and the bailiffry of the hundred of Pyder, were leased out either to Richard Senhouse, or to Mr. Munday, the son of a Mr. Munday, who had previously acted as steward from the time of Henry VIII. It is certain that the Munday family continued from the reign of Elizabeth to be lessees under the crown until the year 1663, when the Mundays were succeeded by Sir Francis Godolphin." [6]

Early History of the Monday family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Monday research. Another 130 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1584, 1657, 1529, 1591, 1555, 1630, 1560, 1633, 1685 and 1739 are included under the topic Early Monday History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Monday Spelling Variations

Multitudes of spelling variations are a hallmark of Anglo Norman names. Most of these names evolved in the 11th and 12th century, in the time after the Normans introduced their own Norman French language into a country where Old and Middle English had no spelling rules and the languages of the court were French and Latin. To make matters worse, medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, so names frequently appeared differently in the various documents in which they were recorded. The name was spelled Mundy, Mondy, Monday, Munday, Mundie and others.

Early Notables of the Monday family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was William Mundy (c. 1529-1591), an English composer of sacred music; and his son, John Mundy (c. 1555-1630), English composer and organist; Anthony Munday...
Another 30 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Monday Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Monday migration to the United States +

Because of this political and religious unrest within English society, many people decided to immigrate to the colonies. Families left for Ireland, North America, and Australia in enormous numbers, traveling at high cost in extremely inhospitable conditions. The New World in particular was a desirable destination, but the long voyage caused many to arrive sick and starving. Those who made it, though, were welcomed by opportunities far greater than they had known at home in England. Many of these families went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Monday or a variant listed above:

Monday Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Hugh and Henry Monday, who settled in New England in 1630
Monday Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • John Monday, who settled in New Jersey in 1771
Monday Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Bernhardt Monday, aged 27, who landed in New York, NY in 1847 [7]
  • Martin Monday, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1848 [7]
  • J Monday, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1855 [7]

Canada Monday migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Monday Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Joseph Monday, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1749
  • Peter Monday, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • Rd Monday, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • Richard Monday, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • Rob Monday, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Monday Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Edward Monday, aged 30, a farmer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Neptune" in 1833
  • Jane Monday, aged 28, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Neptune" in 1833
  • Ms. Catherine Monday, aged 23 who immigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship "Maria Somes" departing from the port of Cork, Ireland but died on Grosse Isle in September 1847 [8]
  • Mr. Patrick Monday, aged 54 who immigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship "Colonist" departing from the port of New Ross, Ireland but died on Grosse Isle in September 1847 [8]
  • Miss. Bridget Monday, aged 2 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "John Bolton" departing 13th April 1847 from Liverpool, England; the ship arrived on 10th June 1847 but she died on board [9]

Australia Monday migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Monday Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Martin Monday, (b. 1833), aged 21, Cornish quarryman, from Mullion, Cornwall, UK travelling aboard the ship "Lady Elgin" arriving in New South Wales, Australia on 4th August 1854 [10]

Contemporary Notables of the name Monday (post 1700) +

  • William W. Monday, American politician, Member of North Carolina House of Commons from Lincoln County, 1838-41 [11]
  • Monroe C. Monday, American Republican politician, Postmaster at Knoxville, Tennessee, 1906-10 [11]
  • Robert James "Rick" Monday Jr. (b. 1945), American former Major League Baseball center fielder and current broadcast announcer
  • Kenny Dale Monday (b. 1961), American two-time gold medalist and three-time All-American wrestler
  • Jon Monday (b. 1947), American producer and distributor of CDs and DVDs
  • Carl Monday, American television reporter for WOIO-TV in Cleveland, Ohio
  • Edigold Monday, Ugandan accountant, businesswoman, bank executive, and educator
  • Horace Reginald Monday OBE, JP,, British Chairman, Public Service Commission in 1967


The Monday Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Deus providebit
Motto Translation: God will provide.


  1. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  2. ^ Arthur, William , An Etymological Dictionary of Family and Christian Names. London: 1857. Print
  3. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  4. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  5. ^ Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
  6. ^ Hutchins, Fortescue, The History of Cornwall, from the Earliest Records and Traditions to the Present Time. London: William Penaluna, 1824. Print
  7. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  8. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 47)
  9. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 89)
  10. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 3rd May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_nsw_1850_59.pdf
  11. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 2) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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