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Lydelton History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The name Lydelton is of Anglo-Saxon origin and came from when the family lived in one of the many places called Littleton throughout England. The surname Lydelton belongs to the large category of Anglo-Saxon habitation names, which are derived from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads.

Alternatively, the name could have of Norman origin as one source claims the name "appears to be a branch of the De Vautort, or Valletort, from Vautort, Maine, of which Reginald, Hugh, and Goisfried de Valletort came to England in 1066." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)



Early Origins of the Lydelton family


The surname Lydelton was first found in Worcestershire where "the name is derived from a place in the Vale of Evesham, where the ancestors of this family in the female line were seated before the reign of Richard I." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.

"The celebrated jurist, Sir Thomas Lyttelton, who had three sons, whose posterity were elevate to the peerage in each line, sprang maternally from Thomas de Luttelton, of co. Worcester, temp. Henry III. The surname probably originated at one of the several places called Littleton, in that county." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.

Sir Edward Littleton (c.1599- c.1657) was the first of four Littleton Baronets. His seat was Pillaton Hall in Staffordshire. He also held a manor in Tiddesley-Hay. "This was a royal chase, adjoining that of Cannock, till the reign of Elizabeth, who granted it jointly to the Earls of Warwick and Leicester, by whom it was sold to Sir Edward Littleton, of Pillaton Hall." [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Humphrey and Stephen Littleton, (or Lyttelton) who both died on 7 April 1606 were probably the most infamous members of the family. Both were both executed for their involvement in the Gunpowder plot.


Early History of the Lydelton family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Lydelton research.
Another 92 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1130, 1407, 1481, 1415, 1481, 1570, 1599, 1570, 1571, 1584, 1561, 1601, 1593, 1650, 1615, 1626, 1624, 1693, 1678, 1679, 1589, 1645, 1608, 1679, 1660, 1670, 1621, 1681, 1640, 1644, 1661, 1679, 1647, 1709, 1698 and 1700 are included under the topic Early Lydelton History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Lydelton Spelling Variations


It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, early Anglo-Saxon surnames like Lydelton are characterized by many spelling variations. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages, even literate people changed the spelling of their names. Scribes and monks in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find several variations that refer to a single person. The variations of the name Lydelton include: Littleton, Lyttleton and others.

Early Notables of the Lydelton family (pre 1700)


Notables of the family at this time include Sir Thomas de Littleton (1407-1481), an English judge and legal author; Sir Thomas Littleton (c. 1415-1481), an English jurist; Gilbert Lyttelton (c.1570-1599), Member of Parliament for Worcestershire (1570-1571) High Sheriff of Worcestershire for 1584; Sir John Lyttelton (1561-1601), Member of Parliament for Worcestershire...
Another 111 words (8 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Lydelton Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Lydelton family to Ireland


Some of the Lydelton family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 65 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Lydelton family to the New World and Oceana


Many English families tired of political and religious strife left Britain for the new colonies in North America. Although the trip itself offered no relief - conditions on the ships were extremely cramped, and many travelers arrived diseased, starving, and destitute - these immigrants believed the opportunities that awaited them were worth the risks. Once in the colonies, many of the families did indeed prosper and, in turn, made significant contributions to the culture and economies of the growing colonies. An inquiry into the early roots of North American families has revealed a number of immigrants bearing the name Lydelton or a variant listed above: George Littleton, who settled in Virginia in 1649; Edward Littleton settled in Barbados with his servants in 1679; Joseph Littleton settled in Virginia in 1765..

The Lydelton Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Ung Dieu et ung roy
Motto Translation: One God and one King.


Lydelton Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  2. ^ Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
  3. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  4. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


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