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The Kinlaw family saga is rooted in the people of the Pictish Clan of ancient Scotland. The Kinlaw family lived in the barony of Kinloch, which is located at the head of Rossie Loch in the parish of Collessie in Fife. The surname Kinlaw belongs to the category of habitation names, which are derived from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads.

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The surname Kinlaw was first found in Fife, where they held a family seat from very ancient times, some say well before the Norman Conquest and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 A.D.

Prior to the invention of the printing press in the last hundred years, documents were basically unique. Names were written according to sound, and often appeared differently each time they were recorded. Spelling variations of the name Kinlaw include Kinlock, Kinloch, Kinlocke, Kinglake and others.


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This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Kinlaw research. Another 317 words (23 lines of text) covering the years 1102, 1296, 1st , 1685, 1st , 1700, 1680, 1744, 1766, 1st , 1691, 1699, 1676 and 1747 are included under the topic Early Kinlaw History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Notable amongst the Clan at this time was Sir David Kinloch, 1st Baronet of Kinloch ( c. 1700); Sir James Kinloch, 2nd Baronet of Kinloch(c. 1680-1744); Sir James Kinloch, 3rd Baronet...

Another 30 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Kinlaw Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Some of the Kinlaw family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 33 words (2 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The freedom of the North American colonies was enticing, and many Scots left to make the great crossing. It was a long and hard journey, but its reward was a place where there was more land than people and tolerance was far easier to come by. Many of these people came together to fight for a new nation in the American War of Independence, while others remained loyal to the old order as United Empire Loyalists. The ancestors of Scots in North America have recovered much of this heritage in the 20th century through Clan societies and other such organizations. A search of immigration and passenger lists revealed many important and early immigrants to North America bearing the name of Kinlaw: Patrick Kinloch, who came to Boston in 1687; Alexander Kinloch, who settled in Carolina in 1703; Cleland Kinloch, who came to South Carolina in 1799; James Kinloch, who settled in South Carolina in 1703.

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The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Non degener
Motto Translation: Not degenerated

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Citations



    Other References

    1. Burke, Sir Bernard. Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry Including American Families with British Ancestry 2 Volumes. London: Burke Publishing, 1939. Print.
    2. Scarlett, James D. Tartan The Highland Textile. London: Shepheard-Walwyn, 1990. Print. (ISBN 0-85683-120-4).
    3. Catholic Directory For Scotland. Glasgow: Burns Publications. Print.
    4. Barrow, G.W.S Ed. The Charters of David I The Written Acts of David I King of Scots, 1124-53 and of His Son Henry, Earl of Northumerland, 1139-52. Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, 1999. Print.
    5. Prebble, John. The Highland Clearances. London: Secker & Warburg, 1963. Print.
    6. Paul, Sir James Balfour. An Ordinary of Arms Contained in the Public Register of All Arms and Bearings in Scotland Second Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1903. Print.
    7. Moody David. Scottish Family History. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1994. Print. (ISBN 0806312688).
    8. Black, George F. The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3).
    9. Browne, James. The History of Scotland it's Highlands, Regiments and Clans 8 Volumes. Edinburgh: Francis A Niccolls & Co, 1909. Print.
    10. Burke, Sir Bernard. Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage and Baronetage, The Privy Council, Knightage and Compainonage. London: Burke Publishing, 1921. Print.
    11. ...

    The Kinlaw Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Kinlaw Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

    This page was last modified on 15 November 2015 at 07:54.

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