Jugge History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The generations and branches of the Jugge family share a name that has its roots in the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain. The name Jugge comes from the names Judd and Jutt, which are pet forms of the personal name Jordan. These names are derived from Jurd, a common abbreviation of Jordan, and feature the common interchange of voiced and voiceless final consonants. [1]

Early Origins of the Jugge family

The surname Jugge was first found in Herefordshire where John Judde was listed in the Pipe Rolls of 1204. Alan and John Jutte wqere listed in the Assize Rolls for Cambridgeshire in 1260.

As a forename the first entry was Judde Rampe who was found in the Assize Rolls of 1246. This custom continued as Judde Clubbe was found in the Assize Rolls for Cheshire in 1260 and Judde de Halifax was found in Yorkshire in 1309. [1]

The Judson variant was generally found later as in John Judson in Yorkshire in 1324 and Henry Juddessone in Cheshire in 1370. Again, this variant literally means "son of Judd or Jutt. " [1]

"Hampshire is at present the home of the Judds, but there are a few of the name in the adjacent county of Wiltshire. In the 13th century Jud was a name well represented in Oxfordshire and Lincolnshire." [2]

"Most of the Judsons, both in England and America, trace their origin to the neighbourhood of Leeds, and the surname is still common in Yorkshire." [3]

Up north in Scotland, "Thomas Judison, and other Scottish merchants complained that their vessel was captured and sunk by the English during a truce, 1359. Andrew Yutsoun was provost of Edinburgh, 187." [4]

Early History of the Jugge family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Jugge research. Another 133 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1204, 1424, 1550, 1619, 1690, 1592, 1662, 1659, 1634, 1531, 1577, 1531 and 1577 are included under the topic Early Jugge History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Jugge Spelling Variations

Until quite recently, the English language has lacked a definite system of spelling rules. Consequently, Anglo-Saxon surnames are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. Changes in Anglo-Saxon names were influenced by the evolution of the English language, as it incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other languages. Although Medieval scribes and church officials recorded names as they sounded, so it is common to find one person referred to by several different spellings of his surname, even the most literate people varied the spelling of their own names. Variations of the name Jugge include Judd, Judson and others.

Early Notables of the Jugge family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include Joseph Judson (born 1619-1690), English-born, Connecticut settler, local official and militia officer. He was born in Kirkbymoorside, Yorkshire, to William Judson (c. 1592-1662) and Grace (d. 1659). In 1634, at the age of 15, Joseph Judson emigrated with his parents and two younger brothers, Jeremiah and...
Another 51 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Jugge Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Jugge family

Searching for a better life, many English families migrated to British colonies. Unfortunately, the majority of them traveled under extremely harsh conditions: overcrowding on the ships caused the majority of the immigrants to arrive diseased, famished, and destitute from the long journey across the ocean. For those families that arrived safely, modest prosperity was attainable, and many went on to make invaluable contributions to the development of the cultures of the new colonies. Research into the origins of individual families in North America revealed records of the immigration of a number of people bearing the name Jugge or a variant listed above: Herbert Judd settled in Virginia in 1635; Christopher and Elizabeth Judd settled in Virginia in 1742; Thomas Judd settled in Cambridge Massachusetts in 1630.



  1. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  2. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  3. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  4. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)


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