Jarmend History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Jarmend is a name that dates far back into the mists of early British history to the days of the Anglo-Saxon tribes. It is derived from the baptismal name German. The surname Jarmend referred to the son of German which belongs to the category of patronymic surnames. In Old English, patronyms were formed by adding a variety of suffixes to personal names, which changed over time and from place to place. For example, after the Norman Conquest, sunu and sune, which meant son, were the most common patronymic suffixes. In the 12th and 13th centuries, the most common patronymic names included the word filius, which meant son. By the 14th century, the suffix son had replaced these earlier versions. Surnames that were formed with filius or son were more common in the north of England and it was here that the number of individuals without surnames was greatest at this time.

Early Origins of the Jarmend family

The surname Jarmend was first found in the Domesday Book of 1086 where the original Latin form of the name Germanus was first listed. [1]

As a forename Jerman filius Willelmi was found in the Feet of Fines for Essex in 1248. John Jarman was listed in Norfolk in 1227. Phillippus Germani was found in the Feet of Fines for Dorset in 1236. Johannes Jeremie was listed in the Pipe Rolls for Yorkshire in 1196. [2]

Early History of the Jarmend family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Jarmend research. Another 72 words (5 lines of text) covering the years 1539, 1614, 1579, 1573, 1645, 1604, 1611, 1614, 1629, 1605, 1684, 1624, 1628, 1628, 1636, 1708, 1591, 1659, 1668, 1666, 1667, 1668, 1724, 1692, 1712, 1724 and 1712 are included under the topic Early Jarmend History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Jarmend Spelling Variations

It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, early Anglo-Saxon surnames like Jarmend are characterized by many spelling variations. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages, even literate people changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Jarmend include: Jarman, Jarmain, Jermayne, Jermain, Jermyn, Jermin and many more.

Early Notables of the Jarmend family (pre 1700)

Notables of this surname at this time include: Sir Ambrose Jermyn; his son, Sir Robert Jermyn DL (1539-1614) was an English politician, High Sheriff of Suffolk for 1579; Sir Thomas Jermyn (1573-1645) was an English politician, Member of Parliament for Andover (1604-1611), and Bury St Edmunds (1614-1629); and Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of Saint Albans, KG (1605-1684), an English politician and courtier. He was second son of Sir Thomas Jermyn, knt., by Mary Barber. In 1624 Jermyn was gentleman in attendance on the embassy to Paris, and in 1628 he represented Liverpool in parliament. On 2 July 1628 he was appointed...
Another 235 words (17 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Jarmend Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Jarmend family to Ireland

Some of the Jarmend family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. More information about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Jarmend family

Many English families tired of political and religious strife left Britain for the new colonies in North America. Although the trip itself offered no relief - conditions on the ships were extremely cramped, and many travelers arrived diseased, starving, and destitute - these immigrants believed the opportunities that awaited them were worth the risks. Once in the colonies, many of the families did indeed prosper and, in turn, made significant contributions to the culture and economies of the growing colonies. An inquiry into the early roots of North American families has revealed a number of immigrants bearing the name Jarmend or a variant listed above: John, his wife Margaret, Elizabeth, Sarah, Priscilla Jarman settled in New England in 1635; John Jermain settled in Virginia in 1739; Thomas Jermayne settled in St. Christopher in 1634.



The Jarmend Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: nec ab oriente nec ab occidente
Motto Translation: Neither from the east nor from the west.


  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)


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