Jardyn History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Jardyn family

The surname Jardyn was first found in Suffolk, where the name first appeared in the early 12th century. Like many surnames, the name Jardyn was taken from a common personal name at the time.

The personal name Jordan (and the female equivalent, Jordana) comes from the River Jordan; some knights and soldiers returning from the Crusades brought some of the water of the River Jordan back with them to baptize their children with and therefore gave the name to those children. [1] [2] [3]

We should point out at this time that another reputable source disagrees with this etymology. "Not, as has been fancifully conjectured, from the river Jordan, in Crusading times, but from Jourdain, an early Norman baptismal name, probably corrupted from the Latin Hodiernus, which was a not uncommon personal name of the same period. It may be remarked that the names Jourdain and Hodierna, the feminine form, occur almost contemporaneously in the pedigree of Sackville." [4]

"Jordan is a name established in many other parts of England besides the North and East Ridings, for instance, in Bucks, Derbyshire, Devonshire, Essex, Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire, etc. In the 13th century it was common as Jordan and Jurdan in Oxfordshire, and was also represented in Lincolnshire, Norfolk, Suffolk, etc. (H. R.). The Jordans of Enstone, Oxfordshire, have been resident in that parish since the 14th century (Jordan's "Enstone"). This surname is a form of Jourdain, an early Norman baptismal name." [5]

In Scotland, "Jordan the Fleming was chancellor to David I in 1142-43, in a charter of Adam son of Swain, c. 1136-53. Jordan de Wodford, charter witness in Angus, c. 1170. Jordanus Brae granted a piece of land to the church of S. Mary and S. Kentigern of Lanark, c. 1214. Magister William Jordanus witnessed confirmation charter by Gilbert, bishop of Aberdeen between 1228-39." [6]

Early History of the Jardyn family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Jardyn research. Another 72 words (5 lines of text) covering the years 1182, 1202, 1327, 1603, 1685, 1619, 1612, 1685, 1611, 1569, 1632, 1569, 1698, 1770, 1698, 1707, 1687, 1691, 1707 and are included under the topic Early Jardyn History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Jardyn Spelling Variations

Before the last few hundred years the English language had no fixed system of spelling rules. For that reason, spelling variations occurred commonly in Anglo Norman surnames. Over the years, many variations of the name Jardyn were recorded, including Jordan, Jordain, Jorden, Jordana, Jordens, Jordin, Jourdain, Jourdan and many more.

Early Notables of the Jardyn family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir Joseph Jordan (1603-1685), vice-admiral, probably related to John Jourdain [q. v.], president of the English factories in the East Indies, slain there in June 1619. [7] Thomas Jordan (ca.1612-1685), was an English poet, playwright and actor, starting as a boy actor in the King's Revels Company. [7] William Jordan (fl. 1611), Cornish dramatist, lived at Helston in Cornwall, and is supposed to have been the author of the mystery or sacred drama 'Gwreans an Bys, the Creation of the World.' [7] Edward Jorden (1569-1632), was an English physician and chemist, born in 1569 at High...
Another 120 words (9 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Jardyn Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Jardyn family to Ireland

Some of the Jardyn family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 85 words (6 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Jardyn family

The unstable environment in England at this time caused numerous families to board ships and leave in search of opportunity and freedom from persecution abroad in places like Ireland, Australia, and particularly the New World. The voyage was extremely difficult, however, and only taken at great expense. The cramped conditions and unsanitary nature of the vessels caused many to arrive diseased and starving, not to mention destitute from the enormous cost. Still opportunity in the emerging nations of Canada and the United States was far greater than at home and many went on to make important contributions to the cultures of their adopted countries. An examination of many early immigration records reveals that people bearing the name Jardyn arrived in North America very early: Thomas Jordan, who came to Virginia in 1623; as well as William Jorden, who arrived in Maryland in 1668 and Ann Margarett Jordon, who arrived in Philadelphia in 1792..



The Jardyn Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Percussa Resurgo
Motto Translation: Struck down, I rise again


  1. ^ Smith, Eldson Coles, New Dictionary of American Family Names New York: Harper & Row, 1956. Print
  2. ^ Harrison, Henry, Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Company, 2013. Print
  3. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  4. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  5. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  6. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  7. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print


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