Housey History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Housey was carried to England in the enormous movement of people that followed the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Housey family lived in Wiltshire. Their name, however, generally derives from the name of the area of Houssaye in the Seine-Maritime region of Normandy. Another equally valid but less common derivation shows that some in some cases the name finds its roots in the word hussey, which was a Old English nickname for a woman who was the head of her own household. "The surname is not to be associated with the modern meaning of hussy." [1]

Looking again in Normandy, France, we found in the Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniae, "Osbert de Hussey, who was living in 1180, was so named from le Hozu, a fief in the parish of Grand Quevilly near Rouen. One Henry de la Hosse or Heuze held, inter alias, the lands of Hosse." [2] It was "found written De la Hossé or Heuzé, De Hosa, and De Hoese," at that time. [3]

Early Origins of the Housey family

The surname Housey was first found in the Domesday Book of 1086 where early Latin spellings of the name prevailed. Walter Hosed, William Hostus were both registered at that time. [4]

"William Hosed or Hostus held Charlcomb, in Somersetshire, of Bath Abbey, as well as other manors in the county: and the first lords of Bath-Eaton were of this family." [5]

Henry Hoese, Huse was listed as a Knights Templar in Oxfordshire in 1153 and 1185. Geoffrey Hoset (Hose) was recorded in the Pipe Rolls for Warwickshire in 1168 and later, William Hose, Huse was found in the Assize Rolls for Gloucestershire in 1221. [1]

Of particular interest is that two sources, a visitation of Dorset in 1623 and a manuscript in ancient French said to have been in the Abbey of Glastonbury at its dissolution, both mention Hubert Husse, a Norman noble who married Countess Helen, daughter of Richard the 5th Duke of Normandy. Both mention he accompanied William the Conqueror to England and was granted the office of High Constable together with considerable possessions for his efforts during the Conquest. [6]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 listed Geoffrey Husey and Reginald Husey as holding lands in Wiltshire at that time. [7]

"Hussey is an ancient name in Somerset and Wiltshire, and further particulars concerning its origin will be found under 'Wiltshire.' From the mediæval Huse probably come the Wiltshire name of Howse and the Somerset name of House. However, the Husseys of Wilts were a powerful family during the 14th century, and traced their ancestry back to the Husees, of whom it is said that the original ancestor came over with the Conqueror." [8]

Little Wyrley in Staffordshire was also another ancient family seat. " Wyrley Grove is the ancient seat of the Husseys, who obtained it in marriage with the heiress of the family of Fowke: the mansion stands at the head of a fine lawn, and is a noble and picturesque specimen of ancient architecture." [9]

Early History of the Housey family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Housey research. Another 130 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1180, 1651, 1265, 1332, 1295, 1495, 1466, 1537, 1503, 1585, 1648, 1640, 1641, 1640, 1641, 1597, 1657, 1645, 1656, 1626, 1664, 1656, 1664, 1642, 1691 and 1294 are included under the topic Early Housey History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Housey Spelling Variations

Multitudes of spelling variations are a hallmark of Anglo Norman names. Most of these names evolved in the 11th and 12th century, in the time after the Normans introduced their own Norman French language into a country where Old and Middle English had no spelling rules and the languages of the court were French and Latin. To make matters worse, medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, so names frequently appeared differently in the various documents in which they were recorded. The name was spelled Hussey, Houssey, Huzzy, Huzzey and others.

Early Notables of the Housey family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Henry Hussey (1265-1332), Sheriff of Surrey and Sussex, created 1st Baron Hussey in 1295. Sir William Hussey or Huse (d. 1495), was Chief Justice and was probably a son of the Sir Henry Huse who received a grant of free warren in the manor of Herting in Sussex in the eighth year of Henry VI. [10] John Hussey Lord Hussey (1466?-1537), was the eldest son of Sir William Hussey [q. v.], by Elizabeth his wife; he is referred to as a knight in his mother's will, which is dated in 1503. [10] Sir...
Another 97 words (7 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Housey Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Housey family to Ireland

Some of the Housey family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 35 words (2 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Housey family

Because of this political and religious unrest within English society, many people decided to immigrate to the colonies. Families left for Ireland, North America, and Australia in enormous numbers, traveling at high cost in extremely inhospitable conditions. The New World in particular was a desirable destination, but the long voyage caused many to arrive sick and starving. Those who made it, though, were welcomed by opportunities far greater than they had known at home in England. Many of these families went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Housey or a variant listed above: Stephen Hussey and his wife Theodate, who settled in Boston in 1632; Christopher Hussey, who settled in Boston in 1632; David Hussey, who came to Virginia in 1648.



  1. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  2. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  3. ^ Charnock, Richard, Stephen, Ludus Patronymicus of The Etymology of Curious Surnames. London: Trubner & Co., 60 Paternoster Row, 1868. Print.
  4. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  5. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 2 of 3
  6. ^ Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey. London: Edward Churton, 26, Holles Street, 1848, Print.
  7. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  8. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  9. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  10. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print


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