Hosea History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Hosea was brought to England by the Normans when they conquered the country in 1066. The ancestors of the Hosea family lived in Wiltshire. Their name, however, generally derives from the name of the area of Houssaye in the Seine-Maritime region of Normandy. Another equally valid but less common derivation shows that some in some cases the name finds its roots in the word hussey, which was a Old English nickname for a woman who was the head of her own household. "The surname is not to be associated with the modern meaning of hussy." [1]

Looking again in Normandy, France, we found in the Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniae, "Osbert de Hussey, who was living in 1180, was so named from le Hozu, a fief in the parish of Grand Quevilly near Rouen. One Henry de la Hosse or Heuze held, inter alias, the lands of Hosse." [2] It was "found written De la Hossé or Heuzé, De Hosa, and De Hoese," at that time. [3]

Early Origins of the Hosea family

The surname Hosea was first found in the Domesday Book of 1086 where early Latin spellings of the name prevailed. Walter Hosed, William Hostus were both registered at that time. [4]

"William Hosed or Hostus held Charlcomb, in Somersetshire, of Bath Abbey, as well as other manors in the county: and the first lords of Bath-Eaton were of this family." [5]

Henry Hoese, Huse was listed as a Knights Templar in Oxfordshire in 1153 and 1185. Geoffrey Hoset (Hose) was recorded in the Pipe Rolls for Warwickshire in 1168 and later, William Hose, Huse was found in the Assize Rolls for Gloucestershire in 1221. [1]

Of particular interest is that two sources, a visitation of Dorset in 1623 and a manuscript in ancient French said to have been in the Abbey of Glastonbury at its dissolution, both mention Hubert Husse, a Norman noble who married Countess Helen, daughter of Richard the 5th Duke of Normandy. Both mention he accompanied William the Conqueror to England and was granted the office of High Constable together with considerable possessions for his efforts during the Conquest. [6]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 listed Geoffrey Husey and Reginald Husey as holding lands in Wiltshire at that time. [7]

"Hussey is an ancient name in Somerset and Wiltshire, and further particulars concerning its origin will be found under 'Wiltshire.' From the mediæval Huse probably come the Wiltshire name of Howse and the Somerset name of House. However, the Husseys of Wilts were a powerful family during the 14th century, and traced their ancestry back to the Husees, of whom it is said that the original ancestor came over with the Conqueror." [8]

Little Wyrley in Staffordshire was also another ancient family seat. " Wyrley Grove is the ancient seat of the Husseys, who obtained it in marriage with the heiress of the family of Fowke: the mansion stands at the head of a fine lawn, and is a noble and picturesque specimen of ancient architecture." [9]

Early History of the Hosea family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Hosea research. Another 130 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1180, 1651, 1265, 1332, 1295, 1495, 1466, 1537, 1503, 1585, 1648, 1640, 1641, 1640, 1641, 1597, 1657, 1645, 1656, 1626, 1664, 1656, 1664, 1642, 1691 and 1294 are included under the topic Early Hosea History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Hosea Spelling Variations

The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries. For that reason, spelling variations are common among many Anglo-Norman names. The shape of the English language was frequently changed with the introduction of elements of Norman French, Latin, and other European languages; even the spelling of literate people's names were subsequently modified. Hosea has been recorded under many different variations, including Hussey, Houssey, Huzzy, Huzzey and others.

Early Notables of the Hosea family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Henry Hussey (1265-1332), Sheriff of Surrey and Sussex, created 1st Baron Hussey in 1295. Sir William Hussey or Huse (d. 1495), was Chief Justice and was probably a son of the Sir Henry Huse who received a grant of free warren in the manor of Herting in Sussex in the eighth year of Henry VI. [10] John Hussey Lord Hussey (1466?-1537), was the eldest son of Sir William Hussey [q. v.], by Elizabeth his wife; he is referred to as a knight in his mother's will, which is dated in 1503. [10] Sir...
Another 97 words (7 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Hosea Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Hosea family to Ireland

Some of the Hosea family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 35 words (2 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Hosea migration to the United States +

To escape the uncertainty of the political and religious uncertainty found in England, many English families boarded ships at great expense to sail for the colonies held by Britain. The passages were expensive, though, and the boats were unsafe, overcrowded, and ridden with disease. Those who were hardy and lucky enough to make the passage intact were rewarded with land, opportunity, and social environment less prone to religious and political persecution. Many of these families went on to be important contributors to the young nations of Canada and the United States where they settled. Hoseas were some of the first of the immigrants to arrive in North America:

Hosea Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • William Hosea, who settled in North Carolina in 1701
  • William Hosea, who landed in North Carolina in 1701 [11]
  • Samll Hosea, who arrived in Virginia in 1722 [11]

Contemporary Notables of the name Hosea (post 1700) +

  • Addison Hosea, DD, an American Episcopal clergyman, bishop of Lexington, Kentucky
  • Hosea Mann Jr., American politician, Member of Vermont State House of Representatives from Wilmington, 1888
  • Hosea Townsend (1840-1909), American Republican politician, Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; Lawyer; Member of Tennessee State House of Representatives, 1869; U.S. Representative from Colorado at-large, 1889-93; Delegate to Republican National Convention from Colorado, 1892; U.S. District Judge for Indian Territory, 1897-1907
  • Hosea Emiliano Gear (b. 1984), New Zealand rugby player
  • Hosea Hunt Rockwell (1840-1918), American Democrat politician, Member of New York State Assembly from Chemung County, 1877; U.S. Representative from New York 28th District, 1891-93; Candidate for Presidential Elector for New York, 1896, 1900 [12]
  • Hosea Ballou II (1796-1861), American Universalist minister, the 1st President of Tufts University from 1853 to 1861
  • Hosea Ballou (1771-1852), American clergyman and theological writer, one of the fathers of American Universalism
  • Hosea T. Lockard (1920-2011), African-American Criminal Court Judge in Tennessee
  • Hosea Merrill Knowlton (b. 1847), American Republican politician, Member of Massachusetts State House of Representatives, 1876-77; Member of Massachusetts State Senate, 1878-79 [13]
  • Hosea M. Ray, American politician, U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Mississippi, 1961-81 [14]


  1. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  2. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  3. ^ Charnock, Richard, Stephen, Ludus Patronymicus of The Etymology of Curious Surnames. London: Trubner & Co., 60 Paternoster Row, 1868. Print.
  4. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  5. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 2 of 3
  6. ^ Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey. London: Edward Churton, 26, Holles Street, 1848, Print.
  7. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  8. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  9. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  10. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  11. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  12. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, June 10) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  13. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 6) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  14. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 9) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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