Hollond History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The present generation of the Hollond family is only the most recent to bear a name that dates back to the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain. Their name comes from having lived in an enclosed region. The surname Hollond originally derived from the Old English word hough which referred to a small protected space. [1]

We enclose this quotation in its entirety: "It has been stated on the authority of George of Croyland, who wrote an account of the family in 1550, that the noble and knightly race of this name could trace themselves backwards thirteen generations beyond the Norman Conquest! For 13 we should probably read 3; and there is a more credible genealogy which makes the fundator gentis one Otho, whose son Stephen flourished under Edward the Confessor, as lord of Stevington, co. Lincoln, and his son, Ralph de Holand, it is said, continued to hold his lands by the permission of William the Conqueror. These lands were in the district of Lincolnshire still known as Holland, but there is also a Holland in Lancashire which belonged to the family. They were ennobled by Edward I., and their blood mingled with that of royalty itself by the marriage of Thomas de Holland with the lovely Joane Plantagenet, the Fair Maid of Kent, and granddaughter of King Edward III." [2]

Early Origins of the Hollond family

The surname Hollond was first found in Essex, where the Saxon Begmundus de Holande was listed c. 975. Lancashire would prove to be a strong homeland in early years as the Assize Rolls of 1246 record William de Holaund at that time. [3]

Some were found at Thingwall, a detached hamlet, in the township of Little Woolton, parish of Childwall, union and hundred of West Derby.

"Thyngwall was given in exchange by King John to an individual whose name is not now on record. In the following reign, Richard, son of Thurston de Holland, held a carucate of land here 'of our lord the king,' for one mark, in exchange for his inheritance in Snodden (Smithden), 'which the king placed in his own forest.'" [4]

"During the thirteenth century the descent of the manor [of West Derby] followed that of the wapentake and land between Ribble and Mersey, but in 1316 Thomas, earl of Lancaster, gave the manor, with 300 acres of wood, to Robert de Holand, and about four years later confirmed the grant with large additions, viz., the manor of West Derby. [5]

Another branch was found at Dalbury in Derbyshire in early times. "In the reign of Edward II. Dalbury and Lees were the property of Sir Robert Holland." [4]

In Scotland, "there are several places named Houlland in Shetland and there are Hollands in Orkney. Hollandbush is in Stirlingshire, and Holland-Hirst is in the parish of Kirkintilloch. Willelmus de Holland, was a witness in the reign of Alexander II. Richard Holande, vicar of Ronaldsay, 1467 derived his surname from one of the three places so named in Orkney. " [6]

Early History of the Hollond family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Hollond research. Another 116 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1352, 1400, 1374, 1400, 1370, 1405, 1384, 1408, 1400, 1407, 1403, 1406, 1408, 1661, 1654, 1656, 1603, 1701, 1640, 1599, 1671, 1658, 1722, 1695 and are included under the topic Early Hollond History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Hollond Spelling Variations

Until the dictionary, an invention of only the last few hundred years, the English language lacked any comprehensive system of spelling rules. Consequently, spelling variations in names are frequently found in early Anglo-Saxon and later Anglo-Norman documents. One person's name was often spelled several different ways over a lifetime. The recorded variations of Hollond include Holland, Holand and others.

Early Notables of the Hollond family (pre 1700)

Notables of the family at this time include John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter (c. 1352-1400), 1st Earl of Huntingdon, English nobleman, primarily remembered for helping cause the downfall of Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of Gloucester and then for conspiring against Henry IV; Thomas Holland, (1374-1400), 1st Duke of Surrey, 3rd Earl of Kent, 4th Baron Holland, Earl Marshal, English nobleman; Duke of Exeter; Earl of Kent; Count of Holland; Alianore Holland, Countess of March (1370-1405), through her daughter, Anne Mortimer,Edmund Holland, 4th Earl of Kent, 5th Baron Holand, (1384-1408), Earl of Kent (c. 1400-c. 1407), the 106th Knight of...
Another 161 words (12 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Hollond Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Hollond family to Ireland

Some of the Hollond family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 61 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


New Zealand Hollond migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Hollond Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. John Hollond, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Swordfish" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 27th July 1858 [7]

Contemporary Notables of the name Hollond (post 1700) +

  • Ellen Julia Hollond (1822-1884), English authoress and philanthropist, born at Madras in 1822, her father being Thomas Teed, and her mother's maiden name Jordan [8]
  • Robert Hollond, English politician, M.P. for Hastings from 1837 to 1852 husband to Ellen Holland, married in 1840


  1. ^ Harrison, Henry, Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Company, 2013. Print
  2. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  3. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  4. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  5. ^ 'Townships: Scarisbrick', in A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 3, ed. William Farrer and J Brownbill (London, 1907), pp. 265-276. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/lancs/vol3/pp265-276 [accessed 21 January 2017].
  6. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  7. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  8. ^ Wikisource contributors. "Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900." Wikisource . Wikisource , 4 Jun. 2018. Web. 4 August 2020


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