Herpennay History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Herpennay is an ancient Anglo-Saxon name that was given to a person who was a person who because of his physical characteristics was referred to as Halfpenn. This person had a slim or slight build and was given this surname as a means of identity. The surname may have also local origins, which would explain Halfpenn Field in Cambridgeshire. The residents gave half a penny per acre to repair the Needham Dyke in that county. [1] A bord halfpenny, or brod halfpenny, was a fee paid in markets and fairs by the Saxons to the lord for the privilege of having a bord or bench for the sale of articles.

"Halfpenny is found written Halpeny and Halpeni; and Allpenny and Alpenny are perhaps the same name. " [2]

Early Origins of the Herpennay family

The surname Herpennay was first found in Worcestershire where Adam Halpeni was listed in the Subsidy Rolls of 1275. A few years later, Richard Halfpany was found in the Subsidy Rolls for Sussex in 1296. [1]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 included: William Halpeni, Oxfordshire; Richard Halpeny, Oxfordshire; and Walter Halpeni, Devon as all holding lands at that time. [3]

In Somerset, Juliana Halpeny and Robert Halpeny, were listed there 1 Edward III (during the first year of the reign of King Edward I.) [4]

Early History of the Herpennay family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Herpennay research. Another 104 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1598, 1729, 1752, 1736, and 1816 are included under the topic Early Herpennay History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Herpennay Spelling Variations

Only recently has spelling become standardized in the English language. As the English language evolved in the Middle Ages, the spelling of names changed also. The name Herpennay has undergone many spelling variations, including Halfpenny, Halpin(Limerick), Halpeny(Monaghan), Halpern and many more.

Early Notables of the Herpennay family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include William Halfpenny, alias Michael Hoare (fl. 1752), who styles himself architect and carpenter on the title-page of some of his works, appears to have resided at Richmond, Surrey, and in London during the first half of the eighteenth century. " Batty Langley describes him in his ‘Ancient Masonry’ (1736), p. 147, as ‘Mr. William Halfpeny, alias Hoare, lately of Richmond in Surrey, carpenter,’ and seems...
Another 70 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Herpennay Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Herpennay family to Ireland

Some of the Herpennay family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 113 words (8 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Herpennay family

To escape the unstable social climate in England of this time, many families boarded ships for the New World with the hope of finding land, opportunity, and greater religious and political freedom. Although the voyages were expensive, crowded, and difficult, those families that arrived often found greater opportunities and freedoms than they could have experienced at home. Many of those families went on to make significant contributions to the rapidly developing colonies in which they settled. Early North American records indicate many people bearing the name Herpennay were among those contributors: Robert Halfpenny arrived in Annapolis Maryland in 1725; Michael Halfpenny settled in New England in 1753; along with Peter; Thomas Halfpenny settled in Norfolk, Virginia in 1823..



  1. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  2. ^ Charnock, Richard, Stephen, Ludus Patronymicus of The Etymology of Curious Surnames. London: Trubner & Co., 60 Paternoster Row, 1868. Print.
  3. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  4. ^ Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.


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