Heearde History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The ancient name of Heearde finds its origins with the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain. It comes from a name for a herdsman. The surname Heearde is derived from the Old English word herde, which in turn comes from the Old English word heird, which means herd. [1]

Early Origins of the Heearde family

The surname Heearde was first found in Shropshire where Thomas Hord was listed in the Assize Rolls of 1221. Years later, Reginald le Herd was found in the Assize Rolls for Somerset in 1243 and Richard le Hurde was found in the Subsidy Rolls for Sussex in 1296. [2]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 include: Robert le Hirde, Suffolk; Richard le Herde, Cambridgeshire; and David le Hyrde, Norfolk. [1]

One entry was found in Somerset in early times, that of William le Hurde, 1 Edward III (during the first year of King Edward III's reign.) [3]

The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 listed Alanus Hyrd; Nicholans Hyrd; and Johannes Hird as all holding lands there at that time. [1]

"An old family of Hird once resided at Woodhouse Grove, Rawdon, in the West Riding [of Yorkshire]." [4]

Moving further north to Scotland, Hird was the Scottish pronunciation of 'herd', a herdsman. [5] Early records show "W. dictus Hyrd was actomatus (attorney) of Bernard, abbot of Aberbrothoc in 1328. John Hird was a tenant of the Douglas in Louchurde in 1376." [5]

Early History of the Heearde family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Heearde research. Another 192 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1273, 1610, 1619, 1627, 1511, 1605, 1626, 1512, 1588, 1512, 1529, 1532, 1534, 1546, 1720, 1808, 1720, 1732, 1810 and 1732 are included under the topic Early Heearde History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Heearde Spelling Variations

Sound was what guided spelling in the essentially pre-literate Middle Ages, so one person's name was often recorded under several variations during a single lifetime. Also, before the advent of the printing press and the first dictionaries, the English language was not standardized. Therefore, spelling variations were common, even among the names of the most literate people. Known variations of the Heearde family name include Herd, Heard, Hird, Hurd and others.

Early Notables of the Heearde family (pre 1700)

Notables of this surname at this time include: John Herd (1512?-1588), English historian, born about 1512 'in that part of Surrey which adjoins the city of London.' After being educated at Eton, he was admitted a scholar of King's College, Cambridge, on 16 August 1529, and a fellow on 17 August 1532. He proceeded B.A. in 1534, and commenced M.A. in...
Another 60 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Heearde Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Heearde family

For political, religious, and economic reasons, thousands of English families boarded ships for Ireland, the Canadas, the America colonies, and many of smaller tropical colonies in the hope of finding better lives abroad. Although the passage on the cramped, dank ships caused many to arrive in the New World diseased and starving, those families that survived the trip often went on to make valuable contributions to those new societies to which they arrived. Early immigrants bearing the Heearde surname or a spelling variation of the name include : John Heard settled in Maine in 1620; Luke Heard settled in Massachusetts in 1630; Walter Heard settled in Virginia in 1650; William Heard settled in Plymouth in 1671.



The Heearde Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Recte et sapienter
Motto Translation: Rightly and wisely.


  1. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  2. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  3. ^ Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
  4. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  5. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)


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