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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2017


Of all the Anglo-Saxon names to come from Britain, Harmitish is one of the most ancient. The name is a result of the original family having lived in the county of Yorkshire in eastern England. Records show that most, if not all of the bearers of the surname can be traced back to a family living at Hermitage Bridge in Almondbury, near Huddersfield in the 13th century.

Harmitish Early Origins



The surname Harmitish was first found in the West Riding of Yorkshire at Kirkless, a hamlet, in the chapelry of Hartshead cum Clifton, parish of Dewsbury, wapentake of Morley. The hamlet was originally the site of a Cistercian nunnery, founded in the reign of Henry II and later passed to the Pilkingtons and later "to the Armytages, whose mansion formed part of the conventual buildings, till the time of James I., when the family erected Kirklees Hall, the present seat of Sir George Armytage, Bart." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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Harmitish Spelling Variations


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Harmitish Spelling Variations



The first dictionaries that appeared in the last few hundred years did much to standardize the English language. Before that time, spelling variations in names were a common occurrence. The language was changing, incorporating pieces of other languages, and the spelling of names changed with it. Harmitish has been spelled many different ways, including Armitage, Hermitage, Ermytache, Ermitage, Armitach, Hermitack, Armitack and many more.

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Harmitish Early History


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Harmitish Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Harmitish research. Another 321 words (23 lines of text) covering the years 1379, 1596, 1662, 1850, 1655, 1641, 1600, 1644, 1629, 1677, 1652, 1694, 1653, 1732, 1660, 1736, 1673 and 1737 are included under the topic Early Harmitish History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Harmitish Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Harmitish Early Notables (pre 1700)



Notables of the family at this time include Timothy Armitage (died 1655), a pastor of the first independent church in the city of Norwich. The Armytage Baronetcy, of Kirklees in the County of York, was created on 15 December 1641...

Another 40 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Harmitish Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Harmitish In Ireland


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Harmitish In Ireland



Some of the Harmitish family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 106 words (8 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Thousands of English families in this era began to emigrate the New World in search of land and freedom from religious and political persecution. Although the passage was expensive and the ships were dark, crowded, and unsafe, those who made the voyage safely were rewarded with opportunities unavailable to them in their homeland. Research into passenger and immigration lists has revealed some of the very first Harmitishs to arrive in North America: Godfrey Armitage of Lynn moved to Boston, Massachusetts in 1639; and Eleazor in 1669 was living in Lynn, Massachusetts.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Semper paratus
Motto Translation: Always prepared.


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Harmitish Family Crest Products


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Harmitish Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Other References

  1. Zieber, Eugene. Heraldry in America. Philadelphia: Genealogical Publishing Co. Print.
  2. Ingram, Rev. James. Translator Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1823. Print.
  3. Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds. Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8).
  4. Library of Congress. American and English Genealogies in the Library of Congress. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1967. Print.
  5. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Walter Lee Sheppard and David Faris. Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England Between 1623 and 1650 7th Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0806313676).
  6. Cook, Chris. English Historical Facts 1603-1688. London: MacMillan, 1980. Print.
  7. Hinde, Thomas Ed. The Domesday Book England's Heritage Then and Now. Surrey: Colour Library Books, 1995. Print. (ISBN 1-85833-440-3).
  8. The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X).
  9. Browning, Charles H. Americans of Royal Descent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  10. Hitching, F.K and S. Hitching. References to English Surnames in 1601-1602. Walton On Thames: 1910. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0181-3).
  11. ...

The Harmitish Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Harmitish Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 16 September 2016 at 07:35.

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