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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


Gurr is a name that first reached England following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Gurr family lived in the district north of Paris which is known in Old French as Gohiere. There are also numerous places in Normandy called Gouy, to which the Anglo-Norman French suffix er was added to make "Gower."

Gurr Early Origins



The surname Gurr was first found in Yorkshire, where a family of Gower, ancestors of the Duke of Sutherland, held a family seat in Stittenham Township. "Descended from Sir Nicholas Gower, knight of the shire for this county in the reign of Edward III., and seated at Stittenham from about the same period." Another reference is more specific, "All of Antiquities agree that this family is one of the oldest in the county of York, though they differ as to its patriarch, whom some say will have to be Sir Alan Gowers, said to be sheriff of that county at the time of the Norman Conquest, while others with greater probability assert that it descended from on Guhyer, whose son, called William Fitz-Guher of Stittenham, was charged with a mark for his lands in the sheriff's account in 1167." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
It is generally agreed that Gower the Poet was from the Stittenham stock. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
Today Stittenham is a township in the parish of Sheriff with as few as 92 inhabitants in the late 1800s. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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Gurr Spelling Variations


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Gurr Spelling Variations



It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, Anglo-Norman surnames like Gurr are characterized by many spelling variations. Scribes and monks in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find several variations that refer to a single person. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages such as Norman French and Latin, even literate people regularly changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Gurr include Gower, Gowers, Gowar, Gowars, Goward, Gore, Goher, Gurr, Goer and many more.

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Gurr Early History


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Gurr Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Gurr research. Another 537 words (38 lines of text) covering the years 1066, 1195, 1198, 1130, 1347, 1330, 1408, 1365, 1543, 1577, 1585, 1638, 1711, 1726, 1780, 1742, 1814, 1767, 1833 and 1700 are included under the topic Early Gurr History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Gurr Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Gurr Early Notables (pre 1700)



Notable amongst the family at this time was Henry Gower, a bishop of St. David's around 1347; John Gower ( c. 1330-1408), an English poet and acquired the Lordship of Aldington, Kent in 1365, He was probably nephew and heir-male of Sir Robert Gower of Kent, remembered mainly for three long poems...

Another 124 words (9 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Gurr Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Gurr In Ireland


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Gurr In Ireland



Some of the Gurr family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 61 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Faced with the chaos present in England at that time, many English families looked towards the open frontiers of the New World with its opportunities to escape oppression and starvation. People migrated to North America, as well as Australia and Ireland in droves, paying exorbitant rates for passages in cramped, unsafe ships. Many of the settlers did not make the long passage alive, but those who did see the shores of North America were welcomed with great opportunity. Many of the families that came from England went on to make essential contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Some of the first immigrants to cross the Atlantic and come to North America carried the name Gurr, or a variant listed above:

Gurr Settlers in United States in the 17th Century

  • Georg Gurr who settled in Virginia in 1621
  • Georg Gurr, who landed in Virginia in 1621
  • George Gurr, who arrived in Virginia in 1623

Gurr Settlers in United States in the 18th Century

  • John Gurr, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1760
  • John Gurr who settled in Pennsylvania in 1760

Gurr Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • Joshua Gurr arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Moffatt" in 1839 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) MOFFATT 1839. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1839Moffatt.htm
  • John Gurr arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Moffatt" in 1839 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) MOFFATT 1839. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1839Moffatt.htm
  • Ann Gurr arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Moffatt" in 1839 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) MOFFATT 1839. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1839Moffatt.htm
  • George Gurr, aged 61, a blacksmith, arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Sultana" in 1850
  • Ann Gurr, aged 35, arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Sultana" in 1850
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

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Contemporary Notables of the name Gurr (post 1700)


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Contemporary Notables of the name Gurr (post 1700)



  • Ted Robert Gurr (b. 1936), leading American authority on political conflict and instability
  • Robert Henry Gurr (b. 1931), American amusement ride designer said to have designed most, if not all, of the ride vehicles of the Disneyland attractions
  • W. H. Gurr, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 1912
  • T. E. Gurr, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 1908
  • Charlotte Gurr (b. 1989), English footballer
  • Andrew John Gurr (b. 1936), New Zealand contemporary literary scholar

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Frangas non flectes
Motto Translation: Thou may'st break, but shalt not bend me.


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Gurr Family Crest Products


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Gurr Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  3. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) MOFFATT 1839. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1839Moffatt.htm

Other References

  1. Bede, The Venerable. Historia Ecclesiatica Gentis Anglorum (The Ecclesiastical History Of the English People). Available through Internet Medieval Sourcebook the Fordham University Centre for Medieval Studies. Print.
  2. Library of Congress. American and English Genealogies in the Library of Congress. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1967. Print.
  3. Hitching, F.K and S. Hitching. References to English Surnames in 1601-1602. Walton On Thames: 1910. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0181-3).
  4. Egle, William Henry. Pennsylvania Genealogies Scotch-Irish and German. Harrisburg: L.S. Hart, 1886. Print.
  5. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Walter Lee Sheppard and David Faris. Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England Between 1623 and 1650 7th Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0806313676).
  6. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
  7. Foster, Joseph. Dictionary of Heraldry Feudal Coats of Arms and Pedigrees. London: Bracken Books, 1989. Print. (ISBN 1-85170-309-8).
  8. Mills, A.D. Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4).
  9. Matthews, John. Matthews' American Armoury and Blue Book. London: John Matthews, 1911. Print.
  10. Virkus, Frederick A. Ed. Immigrant Ancestors A List of 2,500 Immigrants to America Before 1750. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1964. Print.
  11. ...

The Gurr Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Gurr Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 26 February 2016 at 11:35.

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