Grindel History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The ancestors of the name Grindel date back to the days of the Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. The name is derived from their residence at Grindall, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Bridlington, wapentake of Dickering in the East Riding of Yorkshire. [1] [2] [3] [4] The place name literally means "green valley." [5]

Alternatively the name could have been derived from "Grindel and Grendel which were Anglo Saxon personal names [cp. Old English (poet.) grindel, a bar, bolt] Grendel was the name of the ogre killed by Beówulf." [6]

Early Origins of the Grindel family

The surname Grindel was first found in Worcestershire where AEdricus Grendal was listed in the Pipe Rolls of 1180. Other early rolls include: Robert de Grenedala in the Yorkshire Pipe Rolls of 1166; Walter de Grendale in the Feet of Fines for Lincolnshire in 1242; Stephen, Benedict de Grindale in the Assize Rolls for Yorkshire in 1297 and again in the Subsidy Rolls for Cumbria in 1332. [5]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 had two listing for the family: Roger de Grendale, Huntingdonshire; and Walter de Grendale, Yorkshire. [2]

Early History of the Grindel family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Grindel research. Another 71 words (5 lines of text) covering the years 1519, 1583, 1536, 1537, 1538 and 1548 are included under the topic Early Grindel History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Grindel Spelling Variations

Grindel has been spelled many different ways. Before English spelling became standardized over the last few hundred years, spelling variations in names were a common occurrence. As the English language changed in the Middle Ages, absorbing pieces of Latin and French, as well as other languages, the spelling of people's names also changed considerably, even over a single lifetime. Many variations of the name Grindel have been found, including Grindall, Grindal, Grindle, Grindell, Grindel and others.

Early Notables of the Grindel family (pre 1700)

Notables of the family at this time include Edmund Grindal (c.1519-1583), Bishop of London, Archbishop of York and Archbishop of Canterbury. He was "s the son of William Grindal, a well-to-do farmer who lived at Hensingham, in the parish of St. Bees, Cumberland, a district which Grindal himself described as 'the ignorantest part in religion, and most oppressed of covetous landlords of anyone part of this realm'. He went at an early age to Cambridge, where he entered first at Magdalene College, and then removed to Christ's College...
Another 87 words (6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Grindel Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Grindel family

In an attempt to escape the chaos experienced in England, many English families boarded overcrowded and diseased ships sailing for the shores of North America and other British colonies. Those families hardy enough, and lucky enough, to make the passage intact were rewarded with land and a social environment less prone to religious and political persecution. Many of these families became important contributors to the young colonies in which they settled. Early immigration and passenger lists have documented some of the first Grindels to arrive on North American shores: Edward Grindall who settle in Virginia in 1623; Edward Grindall settled in St. Christopher in 1635; Thomas Grindall settle in Virginia in 1639; William GRindall settled in Barbados in 1654.


Contemporary Notables of the name Grindel (post 1700) +

  • Reinhard Dieter Grindel (b. 1961), German journalist, politician (CDU) and football administrator


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  3. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  4. ^ Charnock, Richard, Stephen, Ludus Patronymicus of The Etymology of Curious Surnames. London: Trubner & Co., 60 Paternoster Row, 1868. Print.
  5. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  6. ^ Harrison, Henry, Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Company, 2013. Print


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