Greenslade History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Greenslade family

The surname Greenslade was first found in Devon where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor. After the Battle of Hastings in 1066, William, Duke of Normandy, having prevailed over King Harold, granted most of Britain to his many victorious Barons. It was not uncommon to find a Baron, or a Bishop, with 60 or more Lordships scattered throughout the country. These he gave to his sons, nephews and other junior lines of his family and they became known as under-tenants. They adopted the Norman system of surnames which identified the under-tenant with his holdings so as to distinguish him from the senior stem of the family. After many rebellious wars between his Barons, Duke William, commissioned a census of all England to determine in 1086, settling once and for all, who held which land. He called the census the Domesday Book, [1] indicating that those holders registered would hold the land until the end of time. Hence, conjecturally, the surname is descended from the tenant of the lands of Greenslade, held by Rainer the Steward from overlord Baldwin the Sheriff, who was recorded in the Domesday Book census of 1086.

Important Dates for the Greenslade family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Greenslade research. Another 62 words (4 lines of text) covering the years 1524, 1641 and 1642 are included under the topic Early Greenslade History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Greenslade Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Greenslade, Grinslade, Greenslaid, Greenside and others.

Early Notables of the Greenslade family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Greenslade Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Greenslade migration to the United States

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Greenslade Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • James Greenslade, aged 25, who arrived in America from Devon, England, in 1893
Greenslade Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • John Greenslade, aged 64, who arrived in America from England, in 1902
  • Joseph Greenslade, aged 9, who arrived in America from Liverpool, England, in 1907
  • Elizabeth Greenslade, aged 36, who arrived in America from Liverpool, England, in 1907
  • Matthew Greenslade, aged 32, who arrived in America, in 1910
  • Ethel Greenslade, aged 29, who arrived in America from Hamilton, Bermuda, in 1911
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Greenslade migration to Canada

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Greenslade Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Robert R Greenslade, who arrived in Esquimalt, British Columbia in 1862
Greenslade Settlers in Canada in the 20th Century
  • Anna Isabella Greenslade, aged 35, who arrived in London, Ont, Canada, in 1921
  • Arthur William Greenslade, aged 34, who arrived in London, Ont, Canada, in 1921
  • Samuel Greenslade, aged 26, who arrived in Manuels, Newfoundland, in 1922
  • Jessie Greenslade, aged 27, who arrived in Newfoundland, in 1923
  • Lillian Greenslade, aged 23, who arrived in America from Conception, Newfoundland, in 1923
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Greenslade migration to Australia

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Greenslade Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Ms. Jenefer Greenslade, Cornish settler convicted in Cornwall, UK on 28th March 1806, sentenced for 7 years, transported aboard the ship "Sydney Cove" on 11th January 1807 to New South Wales, Australia [2]
  • Isaac Greenslade, English convict from London, who was transported aboard the "Anson" on September 23, 1843, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia [3]
  • James Greenslade, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Aboukir" in 1847 [4]

Greenslade migration to New Zealand

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Greenslade Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Edmond Greenslade, aged 22, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Lauderdale" in 1874

Contemporary Notables of the name Greenslade (post 1700)

  • John Wills Greenslade (1880-1950), American Vice Admiral in the United States Navy, recipient of the Distinguished Service Medal (Navy) and the Legion of Merit
  • Adam Greenslade, American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 2008 [5]
  • Brigadier Cyrus Greenslade (1892-1985), British Commanding Officer Southern Palestine Area (1944-1946) [6]
  • Ellison Edroy Greenslade (b. 1961), Bahamian police officer and current commissioner of police of the Royal Bahamas Police Force
  • Malcolm Greenslade (b. 1948), former Australian rules football player
  • Henry James Greenslade (1867-1945), New Zealand politician, Member of the New Zealand Parliament for Waikato (1905-1911)
  • Wallace Frederick Powers Greenslade (1912-1961), British BBC radio announcer and newsreader
  • Francis Greenslade (b. 1962), Australian actor specializing in comedy roles
  • Arthur Greenslade (1923-2003), British conductor and arranger for films and television
  • Roy Greenslade (b. 1946), British Professor of Journalism at City University London
  • ... (Another 1 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Citations

  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 30th May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_australia_convicts.pdf
  3. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2015, January 8) Anson voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1843 with 499 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/anson/1843
  4. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) ABOUKIR 1847. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1847Aboukir.htm
  5. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 13) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  6. ^ Generals of World War II. (Retrieved 2015, December 10) Cyrus Greenslade. Retrieved from http://generals.dk/general/Greenslade/Cyrus/Great_Britain.html
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