Floyd History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Irish surname Floyd begins was originally the Gaelic MacTuile, O Maoltuile, or Mac Maoltuile. "tuile" means "flood," and the names Tully and Flood were at one time interchangeable in Ireland. However, some of the Gaelic names that have become "flood" may have been mistranslations, and that contained the Gaelic "toile," meaning "toil," or "will." In Ulster, Floyd has sometimes been used as a spelling variant of Flood; however, Floyd is normally a cognate of the Welsh name Lloyd, derived from the word 'llwyd,' which means ‘grey.’

Early Origins of the Floyd family

The surname Floyd was first found in Connacht, where they could be found since ancient times, and were hereditary physicians to the O'Connors of Galway.

Early History of the Floyd family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Floyd research. Another 125 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1620, 1676, 1660, 1675, 1648, 1563, 1641, 1563, 1572, 1649, 1572, 1603, 1589, 1592, 1593, 1574 and 1637 are included under the topic Early Floyd History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Floyd Spelling Variations

Those scribes in Ireland during the Middle Ages recorded names as they sounded. Consequently, in this era many people were recorded under different spellings each time their name was written down. Research on the Floyd family name revealed numerous spelling variations, including Flood, Floyd, Floode, Floyde, Tully, MacTully,Talley, Tally and many more.

Early Notables of the Floyd family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the family name at this time was Thomas Tully (1620-1676), an English clergyman of Calvinist views. He was born in St. Mary's parish, Carlisle and was son of George Tully. "After the Restoration he was created D.D. on 9 Nov. 1660, and nominated one of the Royal Chaplains in Ordinary, and in April 1675 was appointed Dean of Ripon. " [1] Edward Floyd, Floud or LLoyd (d. 1648?), was a Catholic barrister who became steward in Shropshire to Lord-Chancellor Ellesmere and the Earl of Suffolk. [1] Henry Floyd (1563-1641), was an English Jesuit, elder brother of Father John Floyd, born in...
Another 119 words (8 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Floyd Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Floyd migration to the United States +

Thousands of Irish families left for North American shores in the 19th century. These people were searching for a life unencumbered with poverty, hunger, and racial discrimination. Many arrived to eventually find such conditions, but many others simply did not arrive: victims of the diseased, overcrowded ships in which they traveled to the New World. Those who lived to see North American shores were instrumental in the development of the growing nations of Canada and the United States. A thorough examination of passenger and immigration lists has disclosed evidence of many early immigrants of the name Floyd:

Floyd Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Flag Floyd, who landed in Virginia in 1637 [2]
  • Nowell Floyd, who landed in Virginia in 1637 [2]
  • Melchesedick Floyd, who landed in Virginia in 1638 [2]
  • Rice Floyd, who landed in Virginia in 1639 [2]
  • Tho Floyd, who landed in Virginia in 1639 [2]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Floyd Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Anne Floyd, who arrived in Virginia in 1702 [2]
  • Edward Floyd, who landed in Virginia in 1702 [2]
  • Morris Floyd, who landed in Virginia in 1702 [2]
  • Lawrence Floyd, who landed in Virginia in 1702 [2]
  • Martha Floyd, who arrived in Virginia in 1703 [2]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Floyd Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • John Floyd, who landed in Baltimore, Maryland in 1811 [2]
  • Margaret Floyd, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1812 [2]
  • Benjamin Floyd, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1848 [2]
  • N J Floyd, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1850 [2]
  • Nathan Floyd, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1850 [2]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Canada Floyd migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Floyd Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Mr. Richard Floyd U.E. born in New York, USA who settled in Saint John, New Brunswick c. 1784 son on Honourable Richard Floyd [3]

Australia Floyd migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Floyd Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Thomas Floyd, who arrived in Port Misery aboard the ship "Duchess of Northumberland" in 1839 [4]
  • Elizabeth Floyd, who arrived in Port Misery aboard the ship "Duchess of Northumberland" in 1839 [4]
  • Elizabeth Floyd, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Branken Moor" in 1840 [5]
  • Harriet Floyd, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Branken Moor" in 1840 [5]
  • Jemima Floyd, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Branken Moor" in 1840 [5]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Floyd migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Floyd Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Thomas Floyd, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840
  • Mr. Thomas Floyd, (b. 1817), aged 23, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Slains Castle" arriving in Wellington, New Zealand on 25th January 1841 [6]
  • Miss Caroline Floyd, (b. 1840), aged 9 months, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Slains Castle" arriving in Wellington, New Zealand on 25th January 1841 [6]
  • Thomas Floyd, aged 23, a farm labourer, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Slains Castle" in 1841
  • Caroline Floyd, aged 20, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Slains Castle" in 1841
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Floyd (post 1700) +

  • Elson Floyd (1956-2015), American educator, 10th President of Washington State University (since 2007)
  • Charles Floyd (1782-1804), American explorer, quartermaster in the Lewis and Clark Expedition
  • Raymond Loran "Ray" Floyd (b. 1942), American professional PGA golfer
  • Malcom Floyd (b. 1981), American NFL football wide receiver from Sacramento, California
  • James John Floyd (1750-1783), American pioneer of the Midwestern United States
  • George Rogers Clark Floyd (1810-1895), American politician and businessman, Secretary of Wisconsin Territory (1843 to 1846)
  • Eddie Lee Floyd (b. 1937), American soul/R&B singer and songwriter
  • Cornelius Clifford "Cliff" Floyd Jr. (b. 1972), American former Major League Baseball outfielder
  • Charles Arthur "Pretty Boy" Floyd (1904-1934), American bank robber who operated in the Midwest and West South Central States in the 1930s
  • William Floyd (1734-1821), American signer of Declaration of Independence as a representative of New York
  • ... (Another 54 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Halifax Explosion
  • Mr. Harold James  Floyd (1896-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [7]
HMS Hood
  • Mr. Charles Floyd (b. 1920), Scottish Wireman serving for the Royal Navy from Edinburgh, Scotland, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [8]


The Floyd Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Vis unita fortior
Motto Translation: Strength united is the more powerful.


Suggested Readings for the name Floyd +

  • 447 Descendants of Col. Matthew Floyd, Loyalist of South Carolina and his Son Abraham Floyd by Marjorie Dodd Floyd, The Box Book With McElroy and Floyd by Ophelia Richardson Wade.

  1. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  2. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  3. ^ Rubincam, Milton. The Old United Empire Loyalists List. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1976. (Originally published as; United Empire Loyalists. The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada. Rose Publishing Company, 1885.) ISBN 0-8063-0331-X
  4. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) THE DUCHESS OF NORTHUMBERLAND - 1839. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1839DuchessOfNorthumberland.htm
  5. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) BRANKEN MOOR 1840. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1840BrankenMoor.htm
  6. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  7. ^ Halifax Explosion Book of Remembrance | Maritime Museum of the Atlantic. (Retrieved 2014, June 23) . Retrieved from https://maritimemuseum.novascotia.ca/what-see-do/halifax-explosion/halifax-explosion-book-remembrance
  8. ^ H.M.S. Hood Association-Battle Cruiser Hood: Crew Information - H.M.S. Hood Rolls of Honour, Men Lost in the Sinking of H.M.S. Hood, 24th May 1941. (Retrieved 2016, July 15) . Retrieved from http://www.hmshood.com/crew/memorial/roh_24may41.htm


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