Fayringston History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The origins of the Fayringston name lie with England's ancient Anglo-Saxon culture. It comes from when the family lived in the township of Farington located near Penwortham, Lancashire. "In the 10th of Edward III., William de Farington held certain portions of land here, and 14s. rent, in trust for the abbot." [1]

Another source confirms Lancashire as the original homestead for the family as they hail from "Farington, an estate in the parish of Penwortham, co. Lancaster. Farington or Ffarington Hall was the residence of the family from temp. Henry III. till the year 1549." [2]

Little Faringdon, located in Oxfordshire, dates back to Saxon times when it was known as Faerndunae c. 971 but by the Domesday Book of 1086, it was known as Ferendone, [3] and literally meant "fern-covered hill." Farringdon is also found in Devon and Dorset while Great Farringdon is markettown and parish in Berkshire. "Here the Saxon kings had a palace, in which Edward the Elder expired (died). The town acquired some celebrity during the war between the Empress Matilda and Stephen, from a castle erected by Robert, Earl of Gloucester, who defended it for the empress with distinguished bravery, until want of provisions compelled him to surrender, on which Stephen levelled it with the ground. " [1]

Early Origins of the Fayringston family

The surname Fayringston was first found in Lancashire at Farington, a small village and civil parish in the South Ribble local government district. The earliest record of the place name dates back to 1149 when it was listed as Farinton, and literally meant "farmstead where ferns grow" from the Old English words fearn + tun. [4]

William Faryngdon, goldsmith, in 1229, "purchased of Ralph le Feure all the aldermanrie, and the appurtenances, within the city of London and the suburbs of the same, between Ludgate and Newgate, and also within the same gates which Ankeritus de Auene held, during his life, by grant of Thomas Auerne." [5]

In Somerset, Roger Faryndon was listed there, 1 Edward III (during the first year of King Edward III's reign.) [6] William de Farington was listed in Lancashire in 1376 and years later, William de Faryngton was listed in the Feet of Fines for Warwickshire in 1402-1403. [7]

The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 included a entry for Johannes de Feryngton. [8]

Early History of the Fayringston family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Fayringston research. Another 134 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1066, 1279, 1379, 1595, 1608, 1598, 1658, 1609, 1680, 1660, 1679, 1680, 1659, 1640, 1644, 1719, 1681, 1685, 1698, 1701, 1708, 1713, 1306, 1399, 1400, 1647 and 1850 are included under the topic Early Fayringston History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Fayringston Spelling Variations

Before the last few hundred years, the English language had no fast system of spelling rules. For that reason, spelling variations are commonly found in early Anglo-Saxon surnames. Over the years, many variations of the name Fayringston were recorded, including Farrington, Farringdon, Ferrington, Ferringdon, Farrinton, Ferrinton, Farringtown, Ferringtown, Farington, Ferington, Ferringtowne, Farrintowne, Farringtowne, Ferrintown, Farrintone and many more.

Early Notables of the Fayringston family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include Sir John Farrington; Anthony Farindon (1598-1658), an English royalist divine; John Farrington (c 1609-1680), an English politician, Member of Parliament for Chichester (1660) and (1679-1680); William Farrington...
Another 32 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Fayringston Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Fayringston family to Ireland

Some of the Fayringston family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 236 words (17 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Fayringston family

To escape oppression and starvation at that time, many English families left for the "open frontiers" of the New World with all its perceived opportunities. In droves people migrated to the many British colonies, those in North America in particular, paying high rates for passages in cramped, unsafe ships. Although many of the settlers did not make the long passage alive, those who did see the shores of North America perceived great opportunities before them. Many of the families that came from England went on to make essential contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Research into various historical records revealed some of first members of the Fayringston family emigrate to North America: Edward Farrington, and his wife, Eliza, landed in New England in 1635; with four children; Edmond Farrington settled in Massachusetts in 1638; Edward Farrington settled in Maryland in 1699.



The Fayringston Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Le bon temp viendra
Motto Translation: Good times will come.


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  3. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  4. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  5. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 1 of 3
  6. ^ Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
  7. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  8. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)


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