Eddmound History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Eddmound is of Anglo-Saxon origin and came from the given name Edmond. [1] [2]

Saint Edmund or Eadmund (841-870), was King of the East Angles, martyr, and saint and was born in Saxony in the city of Nüremberg in 841, being the son of King Alkmund and Queen Scivare. "Eadmund began his reign on 25 Dec. 855, and was crowned and anointed king of East Anglia by Humbert, bishop of Hulme, the following Christmas day, being then fifteen years old." [3]

Edmund or Eadmund (922?-946), king of the English, was son of Eadward the Elder and Edmund called Ironside (981?-1016), was king, the third son, probably, of Æthelred the Unready. Saint Edmund (1170?-1240), was Archbishop of Canterbury, born on St. Edmund's day (20 Nov.), probably between 1170 and 1175. [3]

Early Origins of the Eddmound family

The surname Eddmound was first found in Oxfordshire, where the first on record of the family was Edmund of Woodstock, Earl of Kent (1301-1330), youngest son of Edward I, by his second wife, Margaret of France. Born at Woodstock, he received from his father a revenue of seven thousand marks a year. It is thought that Edward I was to confer the rich earldom of Cornwall either on Edmund or on his elder brother Thomas of Brotherton; but the accession of Edward II negated that possibility. Edward II made Edmund Lord of the Castle and Honour of Knaresborough in 1319 and the next year granted him lands of the value of two thousand marks a year. [3]

Many of the early records were in Latin as per the following: Simon dl. Edmundi, Norfolk; and Thomas filius Edmundi, Kent, both listed in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273. [4]

The Testa de Nevill, sive Liber Feodorum, temp. Henry III-Edward I. included the forename Edmund filius Osmund, Berkshire, Henry III-Edward I [5] and later, the Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 included Johannes Edmund; and Edmundua del Grange. [4]

Early History of the Eddmound family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Eddmound research. Another 147 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1544, 1564, 1622, 1563, 1639, 1563 and 1582 are included under the topic Early Eddmound History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Eddmound Spelling Variations

Before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago, spelling variations of names were a common occurrence. Elements of Latin, French and other languages became incorporated into English through the Middle Ages, and name spellings changed even among the literate. The variations of the surname Eddmound include Edmond, Edmonde, Edmon, Edmonds, Edmun, Edmund, Edmunds and many more.

Early Notables of the Eddmound family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include John Edmunds (died 1544), English Master of Peterhouse. [3] Sir Clement Edmondes (1564?-1622), was Clerk to the Council, born at Shrawardine in Shropshire. His parentage is not known, but he is described in the Oxford matriculation register as a yeoman's son...
Another 46 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Eddmound Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Eddmound family

A great wave of immigration to the New World was the result of the enormous political and religious disarray that struck England at that time. Families left for the New World in extremely large numbers. The long journey was the end of many immigrants and many more arrived sick and starving. Still, those who made it were rewarded with an opportunity far greater than they had known at home in England. These emigrant families went on to make significant contributions to these emerging colonies in which they settled. Some of the first North American settlers carried this name or one of its variants: Thomas Edmond who settled in Virginia in 1654. There was a John Edmonds living in Salem, Massachusetts in 1630. Phillip Edmund brought his family to Barbados in 1663.



  1. ^ Harrison, Henry, Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Company, 2013. Print
  2. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  3. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  4. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  5. ^ Testa de Nevill or "Liber Feodorum" or "Book of Fees," thought to have been written by Ralph de Nevill, for King John (1199–1216)


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