Dudine History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Of all the Anglo-Saxon names to come from Britain, Dudine is one of the most ancient. The name is a result of the original family having lived in Doddington, a place name found at many locations throughout England. The name is made up of the Old English personal name Dodda, an Old English word that meant "enclosure," or "farm" and tun, which meant "town." Thus the original meaning of this place name was Dodda's farm or Dodda's town. [1]

Early Origins of the Dudine family

The surname Dudine was first found in Somerset at Doddington, which predates the Norman Conquest dating back to c. 975 when it was first listed as Dundingtune. By the time of the Domesday Book in 1086, the village was known as Dodington. [2]

There are other places similarly named in the Domesday Book but this is the only pre-Conquest village making it of Saxon origin. In early days, some of the family were found much further north in Cumberland at Kirk-Oswald where "the estates [of Kirk-Oswald] were granted by Elizabeth to the Dodding family." [3]

Alternatively, the family could have originated in the parish of Duddington in Northamptonshire. The parish dates back to the Domesday Book of 1086 when it was first listed as Dodintone [2] and literally meant "estate associated with a man called Dud(d)a," from the old English personal name + "-ing" + "tun." [1]

Further to the north, Duddingston is a former village in the east of Edinburgh, Scotland. It was first recorded in lands granted to the Abbot of Kelso Abbey by David I of Scotland between 1136-1147. Duddingston Loch is a loch located in Holyrood Park, Edinburgh, Scotland, below Arthur's Seat. It is the only natural loch in Edinburgh.

Early History of the Dudine family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Dudine research. Another 104 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1536, 1595, 1547, 1551, 1662, 1720, 1715, 1720, 1715, 1720, 1705, 1707, 1707, 1708, 1707, 1713, 1708, 1713, 1663, 1720, 1689, 1693, 1691, 1715, 1715, 1718 and 1717 are included under the topic Early Dudine History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Dudine Spelling Variations

The first dictionaries that appeared in the last few hundred years did much to standardize the English language. Before that time, spelling variations in names were a common occurrence. The language was changing, incorporating pieces of other languages, and the spelling of names changed with it. Dudine has been spelled many different ways, including Dodington, Doddington, Doddingston and others.

Early Notables of the Dudine family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include Bartholomew Dodington (1536-1595), Greek scholar, born in Middlesex and was admitted a scholar of St. John's College, Cambridge, on the Lady Margaret's foundation, 11 Nov. 1547, and proceeded B.A. in 1551. [4] George Bubb Dodington, Lord Melcombe (c. 1662-1720), was an English politician, Lord Lieutenant of Somerset (1715-1720), Vice-Admiral of Somerset (1715-1720), Member of Parliament for Winchelsea (1705-1707) and (1707-1708), for Charlemont (1707-1713) and for Bridgwater (1708-1713.) He "represented the old Somerset family the Dodingtons of Dodington. A John Dodington (d. 1663) held an office under Thurloe, and married Hester, the daughter of Sir Peter Temple...
Another 107 words (8 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Dudine Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Dudine family

Thousands of English families in this era began to emigrate the New World in search of land and freedom from religious and political persecution. Although the passage was expensive and the ships were dark, crowded, and unsafe, those who made the voyage safely were rewarded with opportunities unavailable to them in their homeland. Research into passenger and immigration lists has revealed some of the very first Dudines to arrive in North America: John Doddington arrived in Georgia in 1773.



  1. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  3. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  4. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print


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