Druery History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Druery was brought to England in the wave of migration that followed the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Druery family lived in Suffolk. This family was originally from Rouvray, Normandy, and it is from the local form of this place-name, De Rouvray, which literally translates as from Rouvray. [1]

In the language of Chaucer, signifies love or courtship: “Of bataille and of chevalrie, Of ladies love and druerie Anon I wol you tell.”

Early Origins of the Druery family

The surname Druery was first found in Suffolk where John de Drury, son and heir of a Norman adventurer settled at Thurston. [2]

"The founder of the family in England is mentioned in the Battel-Abbey Boll. He settled first at Thurston and subsequently at Rougham, co. Suffolk, and his descendants Continued in possession of that estate for about six hundred years." [3]

"Drury, Drewry, or Drewery, is an ancient Lincolnshire name. As Drury, and occasionally as Drewery and Druery, it was established in this county and in the adjacent counties of York and Cambridge in the 13th century." [4]

Early History of the Druery family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Druery research. Another 132 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1066, 1627, 1739, 1531, 1617, 1536, 1567, 1607, 1567, 1527, 1579, 1587, 1623, 1587, 1589, 1641, 1614 and 1624 are included under the topic Early Druery History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Druery Spelling Variations

Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence in the eras before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate regularly changed the spellings of their names as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name Druery have been found, including Drury, Drewery, Drewry, Drurie, Drewrie and others.

Early Notables of the Druery family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir Dru or Druie, Drury (1531?-1617), an English courtier, the fifth but third surviving son of Sir Robert Drury, knt., of Hedgerley, Buckinghamshire. [5] Sir Robret Drury (d. 1536), was Speaker of the House of Commons, eldest son of Roger Drury, Lord of the Manor of Hawsted, Suffolk. Robert Drury (1567-1607), was a Catholic divine, born of a gentleman's family in Buckinghamshire in 1567. Sir William Drury (1527-1579), was Marshal of Berwick and Lord Justice to...
Another 84 words (6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Druery Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Druery family to Ireland

Some of the Druery family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. More information about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Druery migration to the United States +

For many English families, the social climate in England was oppressive and lacked opportunity for change. For such families, the shores of Ireland, Australia, and the New World beckoned. They left their homeland at great expense in ships that were overcrowded and full of disease. Many arrived after the long voyage sick, starving, and without a penny. But even those were greeted with greater opportunity than they could have experienced back home. Numerous English settlers who arrived in the United States and Canada at this time went on to make important contributions to the developing cultures of those countries. Many of those families went on to make significant contributions to the rapidly developing colonies in which they settled. Early North American records indicate many people bearing the name Druery were among those contributors:

Druery Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Mary Druery, who arrived in Virginia in 1652 [6]
  • Charles Druery, who landed in Virginia in 1653 [6]

Australia Druery migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Druery Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Thomas G. Druery, (b. 1851), aged 26, English miner, from Durham, England, UK travelling aboard the ship "Pericles" arriving in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia on 5th December 1877 [7]
  • Mrs. Ednea Druery, (b. 1853), aged 24, Cornish settler travelling aboard the ship "Pericles" arriving in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia on 5th December 1877 [7]
  • Miss Agnes Druery, (b. 1875), aged 2, English settler, from Durham, England, UK travelling aboard the ship "Pericles" arriving in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia on 5th December 1877 [7]
  • Mr. John Druery, (b. 1876), aged 1, English settler, from Durham, England, UK travelling aboard the ship "Pericles" arriving in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia on 5th December 1877 [7]

Contemporary Notables of the name Druery (post 1700) +

  • Glenn Druery, Australian ultra-distance cyclist and politician, instrumental in the formation of the Outdoor Recreation Party


The Druery Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Cave ut comprehendas
Motto Translation: Be careful to include


  1. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  2. ^ Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey. London: Edward Churton, 26, Holles Street, 1848, Print.
  3. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  4. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  5. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  6. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  7. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, April 19). Emigrants to Australia NSW 1860 -88 [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/nsw_passenger_lists_1860_88.pdf


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