Dood History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The surname Dood is a Welsh name of old Celtic origin. The surname is from one of the various related Old English personal names Dodd, Dodda, Dudd, or Dudda, which were all in common use until the 14th century. The name Dood may also be a nickname surname derived from the Germanic root "dudd" or "dodd," which means something rounded; thus, it would have been used to denote a round, lumpish person, or a stupid person. The surname Dood may also be derived from the Old English word "dydrian," which means deceiver or rascal, or from the word "dod," which means to make bare or to cut off. The application of the name Dood is obvious in the former case, while the nickname would denote a bald person in the latter case.

Early Origins of the Dood family

The surname Dood was first found in Cheshire, at Edge, a civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester. George Ormerod (1785-1873) wrote the following about the family: "About the time of Henry II., Hova, son of Cadwgan Dot, married the daughter and heiress of the Lord of Edge, with whom he had the fourth of that manor. It is probable that the Lord of Edge was son of Edwin, who before the Conquest was sole proprietor of eight manors; we may call him a Saxon thane. It appears by Domesday that Dot was the Saxon lord of sixteen manors, from which all of which he was ejected; we may presume he was identical with Cadwgan Dot."

Important Dates for the Dood family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Dood research. Another 114 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1671, 1743, 1550, 1630, 1549, 1645, 1549, 1683, 1754, 1665, 1672, 1743, 1672, 1652, 1716, 1652, 1664, 1693, 1719, 1717, 1719, 1729, 1777 and are included under the topic Early Dood History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Dood Spelling Variations

Compared to other ancient cultures found in the British Isles, the number of Welsh surnames are relatively few, but there are an inordinately large number of spelling variations. These spelling variations began almost as soon as surname usage became common. People could not specify how to spell their own names leaving the specific recording up to the individual scribe or priest. Those recorders would then spell the names as they heard them, causing many different variations. Later, many Welsh names were recorded in English. This transliteration process was extremely imprecise since the Brythonic Celtic language of the Welsh used many sounds the English language was not accustomed to. Finally, some variations occurred by the individual's design: a branch loyalty within a family, a religious adherence, or even patriotic affiliations were indicated by spelling variations of one's name. The Dood name over the years has been spelled Dodd, Dod, Dot, Dodds, Dods and others.

Early Notables of the Dood family (pre 1700)

Prominent amongst the family during the late Middle Ages was Sir Anthony Dod of Edge, Commander of the English archers at the Battle of Agincourt. Henry Dod (1550?-1630?), was an English poet, of the old family of Dod, or Doddes, Cheshire. [1] John Dod (1549?-1645), was a Puritan divine, born at Shotlidge, near Malpas, Cheshire, in or about 1549, was the youngest of a family of seventeen. His parents were possessed of a moderate estate, and after he had received his early education at Westchester sent him when about fourteen to Jesus College, Cambridge, where he was elected scholar and afterwards fellow. Peirce...
Another 147 words (10 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Dood Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Dood family to Ireland

Some of the Dood family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 73 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Dood migration to the United States

Many people from Wales joined the general migration to North America in the 19th and 20th centuries, searching for land, work, and freedom. Like the many other immigrants from the British Isles, they made a significant contribution to the development of Canada and the United States. The Welsh and their descendents added a rich cultural tradition to the newly developed towns, cities, and villages. An investigation of the immigration and passenger lists has revealed a number of people bearing the name Dood:

Dood Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Anne Dood, who landed in Virginia in 1701 [2]
  • Roger Dood, who arrived in Mississippi in 1799 [2]

Dood migration to Australia

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Dood Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Miss Ruth Dood, (b. 1843), aged 19, Cornish general servant departing from Soton on 17th March 1862 aboard the ship "Boanerges" arriving in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia on 9th July 1862 [3]

Citations

  1. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  2. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  3. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 3rd May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_australia_victoria.pdf
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