Cooulding History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Anglo-Saxon name Cooulding comes from the Old English personal name which means son of Goldwin, which literally means friend of gold. [1]

Early Origins of the Cooulding family

The surname Cooulding was first found in Essex where the family date back to the Domesday Book of 1086. At that time, it was listed as Goldinc. [2] Over two hundred years later, Golding Aldred was listed c. 1224. William, Richard Golding were both listed in the Assize Rolls for Lincolnshire in 1202 and later in the Curia Regis Rolls for Cheshire in 1210. William Gulding was found in the Subsidy Rolls for Sussex in 1327. [3]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 included listings for the name as a forename and surname: Golding Palmarius, Kent; Hilde Golden, Cambridgeshire; Nicholas Goldin, Oxfordshire; Thomas Goldine, Oxfordshire; and Hugo Golding, Suffolk.

The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls included: Willelmus Goldyng; Robertus Goldyng, pelliparius; and Isabella Goldyng, Howdenshire. [4]

In Scotland "the rashness of a Scots soldier, Ralph Golding, at the bridge of Rokesburgh in 1333 led to Sir Andrew Moray of Bothwell, the Regent, being taken prisoner by the English." [5]

Early History of the Cooulding family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Cooulding research. Another 85 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 1316, 1325, 1563, 1707, 1672, 1536, 1605, 1547, 1549, 1576, 1577, 1579, 1580, 1585, 1584 and 1595 are included under the topic Early Cooulding History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Cooulding Spelling Variations

Before the last few hundred years, the English language had no fast system of spelling rules. For that reason, spelling variations are commonly found in early Anglo-Saxon surnames. Over the years, many variations of the name Cooulding were recorded, including Goulding, Golding and others.

Early Notables of the Cooulding family (pre 1700)

Notables of this surname at this time include: Arthur Golding (c.1536-c.1605), an English translator of more than 30 works from Latin into English, most famous for his translation of Caesar's Commentaries. He was younger son of John Golding, Esq., of Belchamp St. Paul and Halsted, Essex, by his second wife. His father was one of the auditors of the exchequer, and died 28 Nov. 1547. In 1549 he was in the service of Protector Somerset, who wrote, 5 Oct., requesting him to solicit the aid of the Earl of Oxford's servants in...
Another 92 words (7 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Cooulding Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Cooulding family to Ireland

Some of the Cooulding family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. More information about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Cooulding family

To escape oppression and starvation at that time, many English families left for the "open frontiers" of the New World with all its perceived opportunities. In droves people migrated to the many British colonies, those in North America in particular, paying high rates for passages in cramped, unsafe ships. Although many of the settlers did not make the long passage alive, those who did see the shores of North America perceived great opportunities before them. Many of the families that came from England went on to make essential contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Research into various historical records revealed some of first members of the Cooulding family emigrate to North America: George Goulding settled in Virginia in 1607 12 years before the "Mayflower"; Jane and Mary Goulding settled in Virginia in 1650; Thomas, William Goulding settled in Virginia in 1623.



  1. ^ Smith, Eldson Coles, New Dictionary of American Family Names New York: Harper & Row, 1956. Print
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  3. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  4. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  5. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)


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