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Clavering History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



Clavering is one of the names that was brought to England in the wave of migration following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Clavering family lived in Essex, where they held lands and a family seat at Clavering.

Early Origins of the Clavering family


The surname Clavering was first found in Essex where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor of Clavering. They are said to be descended from Eustace, a Norman noble who had two sons, Serlo and John. The former built Knaresborough Castle. The latter had a son Pagan, and Eustace, the progenitor of the Clavering line.

At the time of the taking of the Domesday Book survey in 1086 A.D. the village of Clavering held a Mill, 5 beehives, a foal, 23 goats, and a sail-less windmill. The castle, of which the moats still survive, was built before the Conquest by Robert FitzWinarc. The village was held by the Swein (Earl) of Essex.

Another reference has a slightly different origin of the family: "Robert Fitz-Roger, Baron of Warkworth, the ancestor of this great Norman family, was father of John, who assumed the name 'Clavering,' from a lordship in Essex, as it is said, by the appointment of King Edward I. From Sir Alan, younger brother of John, the present family is descended." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.


Early History of the Clavering family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Clavering research.
Another 226 words (16 lines of text) covering the years 1848, 1850, 1866, 1867, 1565, 1630, 1607, 1629, 1592, 1648, 1620, 1702, 1649, 1656, 1658, 1668, 1707, 1715, 1672, 1714, 1698, 1762, 1727, 1731, 1734 and 1741 are included under the topic Early Clavering History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Clavering Spelling Variations


Before the advent of the printing press and the first dictionaries, the English language was not standardized. Sound was what guided spelling in the Middle Ages, so one person's name was often recorded under several variations during a single lifetime. Spelling variations were common, even among the names of the most literate people. Known variations of the Clavering family name include Clavering, Clafering, Claffering, Clavring and others.

Early Notables of the Clavering family (pre 1700)


Outstanding amongst the family at this time was James Clavering (1565-1630), an English merchant adventurer, Mayor of Newcastle upon Tyne in 1607 who bought an estate at Axwell House, near Blaydon on Tyne in 1629; John Clavering (c. 1592-1648); and his son, Sir James Clavering, 1st Baronet (1620-1702), an English landowner...
Another 97 words (7 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Clavering Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Clavering family to Ireland


Some of the Clavering family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 74 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Clavering family to the New World and Oceana


To escape the political and religious chaos of this era, thousands of English families began to migrate to the New World in search of land and freedom from religious and political persecution. The passage was expensive and the ships were dark, crowded, and unsafe; however, those who made the voyage safely were encountered opportunities that were not available to them in their homeland. Many of the families that reached the New World at this time went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of the United States and Canada. Research into various historical records has revealed some of first members of the Clavering family to immigrate North America:

Clavering Settlers in United States in the 17th Century

  • Peter Clavering, who arrived in Maryland in 1666 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

Clavering Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • T. L. Clavering, aged 50, originally from Glasgow, arrived in New York in 1904 aboard the ship "Furnessia" from Glasgow, Scotland [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JF1P-WMF : 6 December 2014), T. L. Clavering, 16 May 1904; citing departure port Glasgow, arrival port New York, ship name Furnessia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • Thos I. Clavering, aged 54, originally from Glasgow, Scotland, arrived in New York in 1909 aboard the ship "California" from Glasgow via Moville [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JF9Z-1MH : 6 December 2014), Thos I. Clavering, 13 Dec 1909; citing departure port Glasgow via Moville, arrival port New York, ship name California, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • Joseph Charles Clavering, aged 40, originally from London, England, arrived in New York City, New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Cretic" from Liverpool, England [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J64Q-3XM : 6 December 2014), Joseph Charles Clavering, 15 Sep 1919; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York City, New York, New York, ship name Cretic, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • Elaine Violet Clavering, aged 31, originally from London, England, arrived in New York City, New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Cretic" from Liverpool, England [6]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J64Q-3X9 : 6 December 2014), Elaine Violet Clavering, 15 Sep 1919; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York City, New York, New York, ship name Cretic, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

Contemporary Notables of the name Clavering (post 1700)


  • William Aloysius Clavering (1800-1872), 9th Baronet of Awell, Durham, English peer and politician, High Sheriff of Durham 1859
  • Thomas John Clavering (1771-1853), 8th Baronet of Awell, Durham, English peer and politician, nephew of the 7th Baronet, High Sheriff of Northumberland in 1817
  • Sir Henry Augustus Clavering (1824-1893), 10th Baronet of Awell, Durham, English peer, the last of the Clavering baronets
  • Thomas Clavering (1719-1794), 7th Baronet of Awell, Durham, English peer and politician, Member of Parliament for St.Mawes (1753-1754), Shaftesbury (1754-1761) and Durham County (1768-1790)
  • Lieutenant General Sir John Clavering KB (1722-1777), British army officer and diplomat, Colonel of the 52nd Regiment of Foot (1762–1777), Governor of Landguard Fort (1770–1776), Commander-in-Chief, India (1774–1777), Governor of Berwick-upon-Tweed (1776–1777)
  • Captain Douglas Charles Clavering RN FRS (1794-1827), British officer of the British Royal Navy and Arctic explorer, eponym of Clavering Island, a large island in eastern Greenland

The Clavering Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Ad coelos volans
Motto Translation: Flying to the heavens.


Clavering Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
  2. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  3. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JF1P-WMF : 6 December 2014), T. L. Clavering, 16 May 1904; citing departure port Glasgow, arrival port New York, ship name Furnessia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  4. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JF9Z-1MH : 6 December 2014), Thos I. Clavering, 13 Dec 1909; citing departure port Glasgow via Moville, arrival port New York, ship name California, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  5. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J64Q-3XM : 6 December 2014), Joseph Charles Clavering, 15 Sep 1919; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York City, New York, New York, ship name Cretic, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  6. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J64Q-3X9 : 6 December 2014), Elaine Violet Clavering, 15 Sep 1919; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York City, New York, New York, ship name Cretic, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

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