Cheek History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Cheek is of Anglo-Saxon origin. It was name for a 'chick' or one with a prominent jaw. [1] [2] One source notes that while this etymology is the more typical understanding of the name, we should consider that it may have been a Norman name originally as the Magni Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniae notes that "William Cecus occurs in Normandy 1198." [3]

Early Origins of the Cheek family

The surname Cheek was first found in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 which included: Walter Chike, Oxfordshire. [4] Over in Somerset, Thomas Chike was listed there 1 Edward III (during the first year's reign of Edward III.) [5]

Early History of the Cheek family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Cheek research. Another 212 words (15 lines of text) covering the years 1514, 1557, 1586, 1601, 1514, 1557, 1548, 1586, 1659, 1604, 1653, 1658, 1613, 1592 and 1595 are included under the topic Early Cheek History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Cheek Spelling Variations

Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate spelled their names differently as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name Cheek have been found, including Cheek, Cheeke, Cheeks, Cheke, Chick, Chicke and others.

Early Notables of the Cheek family (pre 1700)

Notables of the family at this time include Sir John Cheek (1514-1557) English humanist, Secretary of State, tutor to Edward VI and supporter of the Reformation. His son, Henry Cheke (1548?-1586?), was an English translator Sir Thomas Cheek or Cheke (died 1659), an English politician who sat in the House of Commons (1604-1653)...
Another 52 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Cheek Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Cheek migration to the United States +

Families began migrating abroad in enormous numbers because of the political and religious discontent in England. Often faced with persecution and starvation in England, the possibilities of the New World attracted many English people. Although the ocean trips took many lives, those who did get to North America were instrumental in building the necessary groundwork for what would become powerful new nations. Among early immigrants of the Cheek surname to cross the Atlantic and come to North America were:

Cheek Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Thomas Cheek, who arrived in Maryland in 1668 [6]
  • John Cheek, who landed in Virginia in 1696 [6]
Cheek Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • George Cheek, who settled in Potomac Maryland in 1742

Australia Cheek migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Cheek Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Robert Cheek, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "David Malcolm" in 1849 [7]

Contemporary Notables of the name Cheek (post 1700) +

  • James E. Cheek (1932-2010), American President emeritus of Howard University, recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom
  • Alison Mary Cheek (1927-2019), Australian-born American religious leader; one of the first women ordained in the Episcopal Church in the United States
  • Stephen A. Cheek (b. 1950), American author
  • Louis Ray Cheek Jr. (b. 1964), former American football offensive lineman
  • Harry Gordon Cheek (1879-1927), American Major League Baseball player
  • Joy Cheek (b. 1988), American professional basketball player
  • Savage" Rick Cheek (b. 1977), American Super Heavyweight kickboxer and mixed martial artist
  • Molly Cheek (b. 1950), American actress
  • Chris Cheek (b. 1968), American jazz saxophonist
  • Maurice Edward "Mo" Cheek (b. 1956), retired American professional basketball player
  • ... (Another 14 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)


  1. ^ Smith, Eldson Coles, New Dictionary of American Family Names New York, Harper & Row, 1956. Print
  2. ^ Harrison, Henry, Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Company, 2013. Print
  3. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  4. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  5. ^ Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
  6. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  7. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) DAVID MALCOLM 1849. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1849DavidMalcolm.htm


Houseofnames.com on Facebook
Shipping
Fastest Delivery Possible

Digital Products on Checkout, all other products filled in 1 business day

Money Back
Money Back Guarantee

Yes, all products 100% Guaranteed

Support
BBB A+ Rating

The Best Rating possible

Payment
Secure Online Payment

Entire site uses SSL / Secure Certificate