Cart History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Cart is part of the ancient legacy of the Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. It is a product of when the family lived in an inhospitable or barren area. Cart is derived from an Old English word meaning dwellers of the rough ground.

Early Origins of the Cart family

The surname Cart was first found in Somerset. "The ancient and distinguished Somersetshire and Devonshire families of Cart apparently, in most cases, hailed from the Carys of Castle Cary, a knightly Somersetshire family of the 14th century. In the reign of Edward I. De Cari and De Cary were still Somersetshire names, and evidently their first representatives took the names of places in the county." [1]

Apart from the aforementioned, Wiltshire was also home to the family as William Cart, was listed in the Pipe Rolls of Wiltshire in 1176. [2]

Important Dates for the Cart family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Cart research. Another 89 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 1653, 1740, 1653, 1686, 1754, 1641 and 1686 are included under the topic Early Cart History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Cart Spelling Variations

The first dictionaries that appeared in the last few hundred years did much to standardize the English language. Before that time, spelling variations in names were a common occurrence. The language was changing, incorporating pieces of other languages, and the spelling of names changed with it. Cart has been spelled many different ways, including Cart, Carte, Carta and others.

Early Notables of the Cart family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include Samuel Carte (1653-1740), an English divine and antiquary, born at Coventry in 1653 and educated at the grammar school of that town and at Magdalen College, Oxford. Hi son, Thomas Carte (also John Carte) (1686-1754)...
Another 40 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Cart Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Cart family to Ireland

Some of the Cart family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 43 words (3 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Cart migration to the United States

Thousands of English families in this era began to emigrate the New World in search of land and freedom from religious and political persecution. Although the passage was expensive and the ships were dark, crowded, and unsafe, those who made the voyage safely were rewarded with opportunities unavailable to them in their homeland. Research into passenger and immigration lists has revealed some of the very first Carts to arrive in North America:

Cart Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • William Cart, who settled in Virginia in 1654
  • William Cart, who arrived in Virginia in 1654 [3]
Cart Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Mary Cart, who arrived in Virginia in 1741
  • Jean Jacques Cart, who landed in New York in 1769-1793 [3]
  • Jenny Cart, who landed in New York in 1793 [3]
Cart Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Arnold Cart, aged 30, who arrived in Missouri in 1847 [3]

Cart migration to Canada

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Cart Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Mr. James Cart who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Goliah" departing 21st May 1847 from Liverpool, England; the ship arrived on 18th July 1847 but he died on board [4]

Cart migration to Australia

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Cart Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Richard Cart, English convict from Kent, who was transported aboard the "Adelaide" on April 16, 1855, settling in Western Australia [5]

Contemporary Notables of the name Cart (post 1700)

  • Théophile Cart (1855-1931), French Esperantist professor and linguist

Citations

  1. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  2. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  3. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  4. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 68)
  5. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2014, November 17) Adelaide voyage to Western Australia, Australia in 1855 with 261 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/adelaide/1855
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