Caddy History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Caddy originated with the Anglo-Saxon tribes that once ruled Britain. It is derived from the Old English personal name Cada. With the addition of the diminutive suffix -man, this personal name was popular as late as the 13th century in the forms of Cadman and Cademan. Caddy was originally derived from a pet form of this name. [1]

Alternatively, the name could have been Cadia in Gaelic and in this case, it literally meant "the house of God." [2]

Early Origins of the Caddy family

The surname Caddy was first found in Yorkshire where Robert Cadi was listed as one of the Knights Templar in 1185. Later, Roger Cadye was listed in the Subsidy Rolls for Sussex in 1296; and Henry Cadey, Cady was found in the Subsidy Rolls for Suffolk in 1327. [3]

Later rolls revealed Margery Cade in Cambridgeshire in 1373 and William Cade in Lincolnshire in the same year. The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 listed Matilda Cadi; Robertus Cadison; and Johannes Cady, 1379 as all holding lands there at that time. [4]

In Somerset, William Cade and Richard Cade were both listed there 1 Edward III (during the first year of King Edward III's reign.) [5]

Further north in Scotland where many of the family claim descent, John Cady was a tenant under the earl of Douglas in the barony of Kylbouho in 1376 and Thomas Cady was presbyter in Glasgow in 1440. Peter Cady was burgess of Edinburgh, in 1484, and three persons named Cadie are in Edinburgh Marriage Register from 1606. [6]

Early History of the Caddy family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Caddy research. Another 144 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1086, 1240, 1574, 1577, 1327 and 1641 are included under the topic Early Caddy History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Caddy Spelling Variations

One relatively recent invention that did much to standardize English spelling was the printing press. However, before its invention even the most literate people recorded their names according to sound rather than spelling. The spelling variations under which the name Caddy has appeared include Caddy, Caddie, Caddey, Cade, Cadde, Caide, Caidey, Caidde, Kade, Kaddie, Kaiddy and many more.

Early Notables of the Caddy family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Caddy Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Caddy migration to the United States +

At this time, the shores of the New World beckoned many English families that felt that the social climate in England was oppressive and lacked opportunity for change. Thousands left England at great expense in ships that were overcrowded and full of disease. A great portion of these settlers never survived the journey and even a greater number arrived sick, starving, and without a penny. The survivors, however, were often greeted with greater opportunity than they could have experienced back home. These English settlers made significant contributions to those colonies that would eventually become the United States and Canada. An examination of early immigration records and passenger ship lists revealed that people bearing the name Caddy arrived in North America very early:

Caddy Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • James Caddy came from Wales to Boston in 1635
  • James Caddy and Robert Caddy who were farming in Virginia in 1650
Caddy Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Richard Caddy, who landed in Virginia in 1701 [7]
Caddy Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • William Caddy, who arrived in America in 1805 [7]
  • Henry Caddy, who arrived in America in 1805 [7]
  • Flora Caddy, aged 30, who arrived in Massachusetts in 1812 [7]
  • George Caddy, who settled in New York in 1841
  • Mr. I. Caddy, (b. 1875), aged 21, Cornish miner, from Redruth, Cornwall, UK travelling aboard the ship "Teutonic" arriving at Ellis Island, New York on 5th August 1896 en route to Tombstone, Arizona, USA [8]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Caddy Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Mr. Richard James Caddy, (b. 1880), aged 20, Cornish settler, from Helston, Cornwall, UK travelling aboard the ship "Lucania" arriving at Ellis Island, New York on 15th September 1900 en route to Leadville, Colorado, USA [8]
  • Mr. John Caddy, (b. 1896), aged 4, Cornish settler, from Helston, Cornwall, UK travelling aboard the ship "Lucania" arriving at Ellis Island, New York on 15th September 1900 en route to Leadville, Colorado, USA [8]
  • Miss Julia Caddy, (b. 1891), aged 9, Cornish settler, from Helston, Cornwall, UK travelling aboard the ship "Lucania" arriving at Ellis Island, New York on 15th September 1900 en route to Leadville, Colorado, USA [8]
  • Miss Mabel Caddy, (b. 1889), aged 11, Cornish settler, from Helston, Cornwall, UK travelling aboard the ship "Lucania" arriving at Ellis Island, New York on 15th September 1900 en route to Leadville, Colorado, USA [8]
  • Miss Margaret Caddy, (b. 1884), aged 16, Cornish settler, from Helston, Cornwall, UK travelling aboard the ship "Lucania" arriving at Ellis Island, New York on 15th September 1900 en route to Leadville, Colorado, USA [8]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Australia Caddy migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Caddy Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. James Caddy, (b. 1809), aged 30, Cornish tailor travelling aboard the ship "Orient" arriving in New South Wales, Australia on 4th April 1839 [9]
  • Mrs. Eliza Caddy, (b. 1815), aged 24, Cornish servant travelling aboard the ship "Orient" arriving in New South Wales, Australia on 4th April 1839 [9]
  • Miss Emma Caddy, (b. 1836), aged 3, Cornish settler travelling aboard the ship "Orient" arriving in New South Wales, Australia on 4th April 1839 [9]
  • Mr. James Caddy, (b. 1815), aged 29, Cornish settler convicted in Cornwall, UK on 2nd July 1844, sentenced for 14 years for 2 counts of housebreaking and stealing from Philip Dawe at Ilogan and Thomas Evers at Camborne, transported aboard the ship "William Jardine" on 10th August 1844 to Van Diemen's Land, Tasmania, Australia [10]
  • Mr. James Caddy, (b. 1815), aged 29 born in Wendron, Cornwall, UK convicted in Bodmin on 2nd July 1844, sentenced for 14 years for housebreaking, transported aboard the ship "William Jardine" in 1844 to Van Diemen's Land, Tasmania, Australia [11]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Caddy migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Caddy Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Caddy, British settler travelling from Plymouth with family aboard the ship "Joseph Fletcher" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 19th March 1858 [12]
  • Mr. H. Caddy, British settler travelling from Plymouth aboard the ship "Joseph Fletcher" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 19th March 1858 [12]
  • Mr. Thomas Caddy, (b. 1844), aged 24, British farm labourer travelling from London aboard the ship 'Mermaid' arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 8th January1869 [12]
  • Mrs. Elizabeth Caddy, (b. 1845), aged 23, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship 'Mermaid' arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 8th January1869 [12]
  • Ms. Elizabeth Caddy, (b. 1845), aged 23, Cornish settler departing on 5th October 1868 aboard the ship "Mermaid" arriving in Lyttelton, Canterbury, New Zealand on 8th January 1869 [13]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

West Indies Caddy migration to West Indies +

The British first settled the British West Indies around 1604. They made many attempts but failed in some to establish settlements on the Islands including Saint Lucia and Grenada. By 1627 they had managed to establish settlements on St. Kitts (St. Christopher) and Barbados, but by 1641 the Spanish had moved in and destroyed some of these including those at Providence Island. The British continued to expand the settlements including setting the First Federation in the British West Indies by 1674; some of the islands include Barbados, Bermuda, Cayman Island, Turks and Caicos, Jamaica and Belize then known as British Honduras. By the 1960's many of the islands became independent after the West Indies Federation which existed from 1958 to 1962 failed due to internal political conflicts. After this a number of Eastern Caribbean islands formed a free association. [14]
Caddy Settlers in West Indies in the 17th Century
  • William Caddy who settled in Barbados in 1634
  • William Caddy, who settled in Barbados in 1634
  • William Caddy, aged 21, who landed in Barbados in 1634 [7]
  • Mr. William Caddy, (b. 1590), aged 44, British settler travelling from Gravesend, UK aboard the ship "Hopewell" arriving in Barbados on 17th February 1634 [7]

Contemporary Notables of the name Caddy (post 1700) +

  • John Caddy (b. 1937), American poet and naturalist from Hibbing, Minnesota
  • Jo Caddy (1916-2006), Australian-American painter and ceramicist, who worked in the media of acrylic, oil, printmaking, drawing, and ceramics
  • Douglas Caddy (b. 1938), American attorney who was briefly counsel for the five men arrested for the Watergate burglaries
  • Private First Class William Robert Caddy (1925-1945), American soldier awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor in 1945, he sacrificed his life to save the lives of his platoon leader and platoon sergeant during the Battle of Iwo Jima
  • Samuel H. Caddy (1884-1959), American Democratic Party politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1936, 1940, 1952 [15]
  • Florence Caddy (1837-1923), English non-fiction writer from Middlesex
  • Eileen Caddy MBE (1917-2006), English spiritual teacher and new age author, best known as one of the founders of the Findhorn Foundation community at the Findhorn Ecovillage
  • George Caddy (1914-1983), Australian dancer and photographer from Melbourne, Victoria
  • Benjamin "Ben" Jennings Caddy (1881-1955), Australian trade unionist who is regarded as the doyen of the trade union movement in South Africa
  • Caroline Mavis Caddy (b. 1965), Australian poet, born in Western Australia
  • ... (Another 4 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)


  1. ^ Barber, Henry, British Family Names London: Elliot Stock, 62 Paternoster Row, 1894. Print.
  2. ^ Arthur, William , An Etymological Dictionary of Family and Christian Names. London: 1857. Print
  3. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  4. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  5. ^ Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
  6. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  7. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  8. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 3rd May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_ellis_island_1892_on.pdf
  9. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, May 30). Ships' Passenger Lists of Arrivals in New South Wales on (1828 - 1842, 1848 - 1849) [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_nsw_1838_on.pdf
  10. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 30th May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_australia_convicts.pdf
  11. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 30th May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/tasmanian_convicts_cornish.pdf
  12. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  13. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, April 30). Emigrants to Lyttelton 1858-84 [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/new_zealand_assisted.pdf
  14. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_West_Indies
  15. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 11) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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