Bullen History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Bullen came to England with the ancestors of the Bullen family in the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Bullen family lived in Lincolnshire and various other areas throughout Britain. The name of this family, however, does not refer to these areas, but to the French Channel port of "Boulogne."

Early Origins of the Bullen family

The surname Bullen was first found in various counties throughout Britain. The earliest listing of the name appears to be Gilebert de Bollon who was listed in Northumberland in 1168. [1]

Over one hundred years later, the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 listed: Pharamund de Boloynne in Buckinghamshire; Richard de Boloyne in Somerset; John de Boloyne in Cambridge; and Thomas Boloyne in Essex. [2] Interestingly, the rolls also listed Simon, Count of 'Buloyne' as residing in Oxford. In the reference "History of Norfolk," Simon de Boleyn was listed about the same time. [3]

Anne Boleyn (c. 1501-1536), Queen of England from 1533 to 1536 as the second wife of King Henry VIII, claimed descendancy from Geoffrey Boleyn (d. 1440), a yeoman of Salle, Norfolk.

Early History of the Bullen family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Bullen research. Another 94 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1406, 1463, 1440, 1451, 1505, 1501, 1507, 1536, 1533, 1536, 1480, 1538, 1504, 1536, 1499, 1543, 1477, 1539, 1603, 1576, 1550, 1554, 1454 and 1539 are included under the topic Early Bullen History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Bullen Spelling Variations

It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, Anglo-Norman surnames like Bullen are characterized by many spelling variations. Scribes and monks in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find several variations that refer to a single person. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages such as Norman French and Latin, even literate people regularly changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Bullen include Bullen, Bulen, Bullan, Bulloyne, Bouleyne, Bulleyn and many more.

Early Notables of the Bullen family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir Geoffrey Boleyn (1406-1463), Lord Mayor of London, son of Geoffrey Boleyn (d. 1440) yeoman of Salle, Norfolk; Sir William Boleyn (1451-1505), the son of Sir Geoffrey Boleyn, a wealthy mercer and Lord Mayor of London; Admiral Sir Charles Bullen; Anne Boleyn (c.1501 or 1507-1536), Queen of England (1533-1536), 1st Marquess of Pembroke, second wife of King Henry VIII; Elizabeth Boleyn (1480-1538), Countess of Wiltshire, mother of Anne Boleyn; George Boleyn (1504-1536), Viscount Rochford, brother of Anne, executed with her for incest, adultery and treason; Mary Boleyn (c.1499-1543), Anne's sister and a long-term...
Another 156 words (11 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Bullen Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Bullen family to Ireland

Some of the Bullen family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 80 words (6 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Bullen migration to the United States +

Faced with the chaos present in England at that time, many English families looked towards the open frontiers of the New World with its opportunities to escape oppression and starvation. People migrated to North America, as well as Australia and Ireland in droves, paying exorbitant rates for passages in cramped, unsafe ships. Many of the settlers did not make the long passage alive, but those who did see the shores of North America were welcomed with great opportunity. Many of the families that came from England went on to make essential contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Some of the first immigrants to cross the Atlantic and come to North America carried the name Bullen, or a variant listed above:

Bullen Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Silvester Bullen who settled in Virginia in 1624
  • Silvester Bullen, who landed in Virginia in 1624-1625 [4]
  • Silvester Bullen was recorded as having arrived in Virginia between 1624 and 1625
  • Samuel Bullen, who arrived in Dedham, Massachusetts in 1641
  • Samuel Bullen, who arrived in Dedham, Massachusetts in 1641 [4]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Bullen Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Philip Bullen, who arrived in Charlestown, Massachusetts in 1735 [4]
  • Richard Bullen, who arrived in New York State in 1752
  • Conrad Bullen, who landed in North Carolina in 1763 [4]
  • Conrad Bullen, who arrived in North Carolina in 1763
  • John Bullen, who settled in Maryland in 1775
Bullen Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Mary Bullen, who landed in New York, NY in 1811 [4]
  • George Bullen, who landed in Indiana in 1852 [4]
  • Robert Bullen, who landed in Indiana in 1852 [4]
  • George Bullen, who arrived in Indiana in 1852

Australia Bullen migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

  • Mr. Frederick E. Bullen, aged 33, Cornish clerk who immigrated to New South Wales, Australia aboard the ship "Roscoe" in 1855 convicted at Darlinghurst Gaol in [5]
Bullen Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. William Bullen (b. 1809), aged 24, Cornish settler convicted in Cornwall, UK on 1st January 1833, sentenced for life for stealing sheep, transported aboard the ship "Neva" on 27th July 1833 to New South Wales, Australia [6]
  • Mr. William Bullen (b. 1809), aged 24, Cornish settler convicted in Cornwall, UK on 1st January 1833, sentenced for 14 years for stealing sheep, transported aboard the ship "Neva" on 27th July 1833 to New South Wales, Australia [6]
  • Mr. John Bullen, (b. 1820), aged 23, Cornish settler convicted in Cornwall, UK on 3rd August 1843, sentenced for 10 years for theft of brass from Charlestown United Mines, transported aboard the ship "Marion" on 22nd November 1843 to Van Diemen's Land, Tasmania, Australia [6]
  • Mr. John Bullen, (b. 1820), aged 23 convicted in Cornwall on 3rd August 1843, sentenced for 10 years for stealing brass, transported aboard the ship "Marion" in 1843 to Van Diemen's Land, Tasmania, Australia [7]
  • Mr. Amos Bullen, English convict who was convicted in London, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Barossa" on 9th May 1844, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [8]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Bullen migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Bullen Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Rodger K Bullen, who landed in Bay of Islands, New Zealand in 1836
  • R. Bullen, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Gertrude" in 1863
  • Robert Bullen, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Gertrude" in 1863
  • Thomas Bullen, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Gertrude" in 1863
  • Walter Bullen, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Gertrude" in 1863
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Bullen (post 1700) +

  • Charles William 'Chic' Bullen (1919-2009), American politician who served in the Utah House of Representatives from 1971 to 1977 and later in the Utah State Senate from 1977 to 1985
  • Adelaide Kendall Bullen (b. 1908), American anthropologist
  • Sir Charles Bullen GCB GCH (1769-1853), English naval officer during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars and at the Battle of Trafalgar [9]
  • William Bullen, English cricketer in the late 1700s who made 120 known first-class appearances
  • Nicholas Bullen (b. 1968), English composer, artist and writer from Coventry
  • Luke Bullen (b. 1973), English drummer and percussionist from Norwich
  • Frank Thomas Bullen (1857-1915), English writer
  • Stafford Bullen (1925-2001), Australian circus proprietor and co-founder of the African Lion Safari, Warragamba
  • Arthur Henry Bullen (1857-1920), British man of letters who was an authority of 16th and 17th century literature, and rediscovered the work of Thomas Campion in 1899, after nearly 300 years of neglect
  • Marc Bullen (b. 1982), Australian rules footballer
  • ... (Another 3 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

RMS Lusitania
  • Mr. Henry Garnet Bullen, Canadian 2nd Class passenger from Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, who sailed aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking [10]


The Bullen Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: E Rege et victoria
Motto Translation: The King and victory.


  1. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  2. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  3. ^ Rye, Walter, A History of Norfolk. London: Elliot Stock, 62, Paternoster Row, 1885. Print
  4. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  5. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retreived 3rd May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_nsw_gaol_admissions.pdf
  6. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 30th May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_australia_convicts.pdf
  7. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 30th May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/tasmanian_convicts_cornish.pdf
  8. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 24th September 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/barossa
  9. ^ Wikisource contributors. "Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900." Wikisource . Wikisource , 4 Jun. 2018. Web. 5 Feb. 2019
  10. ^ Lusitania Passenger List - The Lusitania Resource. (Retrieved 2014, March 7) . Retrieved from http://www.rmslusitania.info/lusitania-passenger-list/


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