Breckon History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Breckon family

The surname Breckon was first found in Angus (Gaelic: Aonghas), part of the Tayside region of northeastern Scotland, and present day Council Area of Angus, formerly known as Forfar or Forfarshire, where they held a family seat in the town of Brechin.

"This place derives its name, of Gaelic origin, from its situation on an acclivity rising from the banks of the river South Esk; it is of very considerable antiquity, and was formerly the seat of a diocese, the cathedral of which is now the church of the parish. " [1]

Isaac of Brechin in 1178 was one of the first to use the name as a surname. In their early history they seemed to be closely related to the church and church activities, and frequent mention is made of their relationship with the Bishops of Brechin. Conjecturally this Isaac may have been the spearhead of many of the Norman families invited north by King David I of Scotland about 1130, and granted lands at Brechin. [2]

Sir David Brechin (d. 1321), Lord of Brechin, a royal burgh in Angusshire, was eldest son of Sir David of Brechin, one of the barons of Scotland who attended Edward I into France 1297. "His mother, whose Christian name is not known, was one of the seven sisters of King Robert Bruce, but his father seems to have favoured the English side up to the king's victory at Inverary in 1308, when he retired to his castle of Brechin. "[3]

Much further to the south in St. Ive, Cornwall, England we found this interesting passage: "There was a little king of Wales named Brechan, from whom the district of Brecknock derived its name. This king had twenty-four sons and daughters, who finally took up their residence in various parts of Devonshire and Cornwall, where they lived as hermits; on which account they were considered as holy martyrs, saints, or confessors. One of these, whose name was John, took up his abode in Cornwall, in a parish that has assumed his name." [4]

Early History of the Breckon family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Breckon research. Another 149 words (11 lines of text) covering the years 1234, 1296, 1320, 1330, 1471, 1541, 1600 and 1672 are included under the topic Early Breckon History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Breckon Spelling Variations

The many spelling variations in Medieval Scottish names result from the fact that scribes in that era spelled words according to sound. Translation too, was an undeveloped science, and many names were altered into complete obscurity. Over the years Breckon has been spelled Brechin, Breechin, Breichen, Brichan, Brichane, Breching and many more.

Early Notables of the Breckon family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Breckon Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


New Zealand Breckon migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Breckon Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Edward Breckon, aged 20, a carpenter, who arrived in Hawkes Bay aboard the ship "Hudson" in 1879

Contemporary Notables of the name Breckon (post 1700) +

  • Donald J. Breckon, American politician, Mayor of Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, 1987 [5]
  • Alan Breckon, British politician, Senator of the States of Jersey (2008-), former Chairman of the Jersey Consumer Council

HMS Dorsetshire
  • Sydney Wilson Breckon, British Sub Lieutenant aboard the HMS Dorsetshire when she was struck by air bombers and sunk; he survived the sinking [6]


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  3. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  4. ^ Hutchins, Fortescue, The History of Cornwall, from the Earliest Records and Traditions to the Present Time. London: William Penaluna, 1824. Print
  5. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 25) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  6. ^ Force Z Survivors HMS Dorsetshire Crew List, (Retrieved 2018, February 13th), https://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listdorsetshirecrew.html


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