Bramer History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Anglo-Saxon name Bramer comes from the family having resided in Bramhall in Greater Manchester. Bromale was a township in the parish of Stockport.

Early Origins of the Bramer family

The surname Bramer was first found in Greater Manchester where the place dates back to at least the Domesday Book where it is listed as Bramale (Bromale.) [1] In more recent years, the township is known as Bramhall and is found in the parish and union of Stockport, hundred of Macclesfield, Chester.

"The manorial mansion is a curious edifice of timber and brick plastered over; it stands on elevated ground, and possesses great interest, as part of the wooden building is supposed to date as far back as the reign of John. At the south-east angle is the domestic chapel, apparently of the time of Richard III., having a flat panelled roof, and a considerable quantity of painted glass in the windows." [2]

The place name literally means "nook of land where broom grows" derived from the Old English words "brom" + "halh" [3].

The first record of the family was listed in the source, Earwaker's East Cheshire where Mathew de Bromale was listed as holding lands in Cheshire, temp. 1150. [4]

Some of the family has Scottish roots as noted by Broomhall Castle, built in 1874, located in Menstrie, Clackmannanshire, Scotland. It is still in good condition and today is in use as a hotel.

Early History of the Bramer family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Bramer research. Another 62 words (4 lines of text) covering the years 1502, 1594, 1663, 1635, 1659, 1653 and 1654 are included under the topic Early Bramer History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Bramer Spelling Variations

Bramer has been spelled many different ways. Before English spelling became standardized over the last few hundred years, spelling variations in names were a common occurrence. As the English language changed in the Middle Ages, absorbing pieces of Latin and French, as well as other languages, the spelling of people's names also changed considerably, even over a single lifetime. Spelling variants included: Bramhall, Bramall, Bramhill, Brammall, Bramwell and others.

Early Notables of the Bramer family (pre 1700)

Notables of the family at this time include John Bramhall, Mayor of Pontefract in 1502; and John Bramhall (1594 -1663) an Anglican theologian and apologist, Archbishop of Armagh, Primate of All Ireland. He was born in Pontefract...
Another 37 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Bramer Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Bramer migration to the United States +

In an attempt to escape the chaos experienced in England, many English families boarded overcrowded and diseased ships sailing for the shores of North America and other British colonies. Those families hardy enough, and lucky enough, to make the passage intact were rewarded with land and a social environment less prone to religious and political persecution. Many of these families became important contributors to the young colonies in which they settled. Early immigration and passenger lists have documented some of the first Bramers to arrive on North American shores:

Bramer Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Jacob Bramer, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1753 [5]
  • Wilhelm Bramer, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1774 [5]
Bramer Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • H Bramer, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1850 [5]
  • Frederick Bramer, who landed in Illinois in 1856-1864 [5]

Contemporary Notables of the name Bramer (post 1700) +

  • Jimmy Van Bramer, member of the New York City Council
  • Leonaert Bramer (1596-1674), Dutch painter
  • Shannon Bramer (b. 1973), Canadian poet

Bismarck
  • Hubert Brämer (1921-1941), German Matrose who served aboard the German Battleship Bismarck during World War II when it was sunk heading to France; he died in the sinking [6]


The Bramer Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Sanguine Christe tuo
Motto Translation: By Thy Blood O' Christ.


  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  3. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  4. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  5. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  6. ^ Bismarck & Tirpitz Class - Crew List Bismarck. (Retrieved 2018, February 06). Retrieved from https://www.bismarck-class.dk/bismarck/crew/bismarck_crew.html#crew_details


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