Blewett History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The ancient Normans that arrived in England following the Conquest of 1066 are the initial ancestors from which the many generations of the Blewett family have grown. The name Blewett was given to a member of the family who was a person with blue eyes, or who often wore blue clothing. The name stems from the Old French root bleuet which means blue. The family claimed Briqueville-la-Blouette, in Normandy as their point of origin. This name was still represented there as "Blouet de Cahagnolles," belonging to the Bailiwick of Caen, sat in the great Assembly of the Norman nobles in 1789. [1]

Early Origins of the Blewett family

The surname Blewett was first found in Hampshire where Richard Blouet is on the Dives Roll; and Ralph Bloiet was an undertenant in the Domesday Book of 1086. He is mentioned in the Monasticon Anglicanum as a benefactor to Gloucester Abbey. [1]

Robert Bloet (Bloett) (died 1123), was an early English prelate. He was Bishop of Lincoln 1093-1123 and Lord Chancellor of England (1092-1093.) He claimed descent from a Norman noble family that held Ivry in Normandy. He accompanied William the Conqueror's son, William Rufus to England from Normandy.

He was brother of Hugh, Bishop of Bayeux. "When the king lay on his death-bed at Rouen, he sent Bloet to England with a letter praying Archbishop Lanfranc to crown William Rufus. Bloet crossed the Channel in company with Rufus himself, and became the new king's chancellor. After the death of Remigius in 1092, the see of Lincoln was kept vacant for a year. Rufus, however, repented of his evil ways while he lay sick at Gloucester in the spring of 1093, and at the same time that he made Anselm archbishop he gave the bishopric of Lincoln to Robert Bloet." [2]

The son or grandson of this fabled Earl, Sir Roland Bluet, became Lord of Raglan in right of his wife Lucretia, and his posterity held the castle for several generations. William Bluett was summoned with other barons to march against the Welsh in 1256. [1]

From these very early entry of the family, the family dispersed as seen by the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 listing: John Bleuit, Gloucestershire; Robert Bluet, Lincolnshire; and Walter Bluet, London. [3]

"The family of Bluet is said by Camden to have come from Brittany. The name is spelt in the Battel Roll Bluet, and Bluat, and elsewhere Bloet." [4]

Early History of the Blewett family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Blewett research. Another 341 words (24 lines of text) covering the years 1566, 1566, 1656, 1644 and 1172 are included under the topic Early Blewett History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Blewett Spelling Variations

The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries. For that reason, spelling variations are common among many Anglo-Norman names. The shape of the English language was frequently changed with the introduction of elements of Norman French, Latin, and other European languages; even the spelling of literate people's names were subsequently modified. Blewett has been recorded under many different variations, including Blewett, Blewitt, Bluet, Bluat, Bloet, Blouet, Blewit, Blewet and many more.

Early Notables of the Blewett family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Ralph Bloet who was seized of the manor of Daglingworth, temp. Henry II. in Leicestershire. His son named Morgan, was elected Bishop of Durham, but was denied a dispensation by the Pope, as the canons require in case of bastardy, because he persisted to own himself the King's son, and not...
Another 59 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Blewett Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Blewett Ranking

In the United States, the name Blewett is the 14,685th most popular surname with an estimated 2,487 people with that name. [5]

Ireland Migration of the Blewett family to Ireland

Some of the Blewett family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 42 words (3 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Blewett migration to the United States +

To escape the uncertainty of the political and religious uncertainty found in England, many English families boarded ships at great expense to sail for the colonies held by Britain. The passages were expensive, though, and the boats were unsafe, overcrowded, and ridden with disease. Those who were hardy and lucky enough to make the passage intact were rewarded with land, opportunity, and social environment less prone to religious and political persecution. Many of these families went on to be important contributors to the young nations of Canada and the United States where they settled. Blewetts were some of the first of the immigrants to arrive in North America:

Blewett Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Margery Blewett, who landed in Virginia in 1654 [6]
Blewett Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Mr. James Blewett, (b. 1865), aged 22, Cornish miner departing from Liverpool aboard the ship "Aurania" arriving in New York, USA on 5 April 1887 [7]
  • Mr. John Blewett, (b. 1852), aged 37, Cornish quarryman departing from Liverpool aboard the ship "Bothnia" arriving in the United States on 21 September 1889 [7]
  • Mr. Richard Blewett, (b. 1875), aged 24, Cornish quarryman, from Penzance, Cornwall, UK travelling aboard the ship "Campania" arriving at Ellis Island, New York on 30th September 1899 en route to Colorado, USA [8]
  • Mr. William Blewett, (b. 1879), aged 20, Cornish labourer, from Penzance, Cornwall, UK travelling aboard the ship "Campania" arriving at Ellis Island, New York on 30th September 1899 en route to Red Jacket, Michigan, USA [8]
Blewett Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Mr. Stephen Blewett, (b. 1890), aged 13, Cornish settler, from Penzance, Cornwall, UK travelling aboard the ship "Teutonic" arriving at Ellis Island, New York on 9th April 1903 en route to New York, USA [8]
  • Miss Winnie Blewett, (b. 1892), aged 11, Cornish settler travelling aboard the ship "St Paul" arriving at Ellis Island, New York on 16th May 1903 en route to Michigan, USA [8]
  • Miss Lillian Blewett, (b. 1897), aged 6, Cornish settler travelling aboard the ship "St Paul" arriving at Ellis Island, New York on 16th May 1903 en route to Michigan, USA [8]
  • Mr. Frank Blewett, (b. 1868), aged 35, Cornish labourer, from Penzance, Cornwall, UK travelling aboard the ship "Teutonic" arriving at Ellis Island, New York on 9th April 1903 en route to New York, USA [8]
  • Mrs. Annie Blewett, (b. 1873), aged 30, Cornish settler travelling aboard the ship "St Paul" arriving at Ellis Island, New York on 16th May 1903 en route to Michigan, USA [8]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Australia Blewett migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Blewett Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • John Blewett, aged 21, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Hooghly" [9]
  • Edward Blewett, aged 26, a miner, who arrived in South Australia in 1858 aboard the ship "Melbourne"
  • Mr. George H. Blewett, (b. 1840), aged 23, Cornish farm labourer departing from Liverpool on 1st February 1863 aboard the ship "Clara" arriving in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia on 28th April 1863 [10]
  • Mrs. Elizabeth R. Blewett, (b. 1841), aged 22, Cornish settler departing from Liverpool on 1st February 1863 aboard the ship "Clara" arriving in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia on 28th April 1863 [10]
  • Miss Mary Blewett, (b. 1841), aged 39, Cornish housekeeper travelling aboard the ship "Norval" arriving in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia on 2nd March 1880 [11]

New Zealand Blewett migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Blewett Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • William Blewett, aged 25, who arrived in Lyttelton, New Zealand aboard the ship "Accrington" in 1863
  • Anna Blewett, aged 28, who arrived in Lyttelton, New Zealand aboard the ship "Accrington" in 1863
  • William Blewett, aged 23, who arrived in Lyttelton, New Zealand aboard the ship "Accrington" in 1863
  • Ruth Blewett, aged 23, who arrived in Lyttelton, New Zealand aboard the ship "Accrington" in 1863
  • James Blewett, aged 3, who arrived in Lyttelton, New Zealand aboard the ship "Accrington" in 1863
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

West Indies Blewett migration to West Indies +

The British first settled the British West Indies around 1604. They made many attempts but failed in some to establish settlements on the Islands including Saint Lucia and Grenada. By 1627 they had managed to establish settlements on St. Kitts (St. Christopher) and Barbados, but by 1641 the Spanish had moved in and destroyed some of these including those at Providence Island. The British continued to expand the settlements including setting the First Federation in the British West Indies by 1674; some of the islands include Barbados, Bermuda, Cayman Island, Turks and Caicos, Jamaica and Belize then known as British Honduras. By the 1960's many of the islands became independent after the West Indies Federation which existed from 1958 to 1962 failed due to internal political conflicts. After this a number of Eastern Caribbean islands formed a free association. [12]
Blewett Settlers in West Indies in the 17th Century
  • William Blewett, who settled in Barbados in 1670

Contemporary Notables of the name Blewett (post 1700) +

  • John Blewett III (1973-2007), American NASCAR driver
  • Mary H. Blewett (b. 1938), American historian
  • Gregory Scott Blewett (b. 1971), Australian cricketer
  • Neal Blewett AC (b. 1933), Australian politician and Rhodes Scholar
  • Kate Blewett, British film-maker
  • George John Blewett (1873-1912), Canadian philosopher academic and philosopher


The Blewett Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: In Deo omnia
Motto Translation: In God are all things.


  1. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 1 of 3
  2. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  3. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  4. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  5. ^ https://namecensus.com/most_common_surnames.htm
  6. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  7. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, April 30). Emigrants to New York 1820 - 1891 [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_new_york_1820_1891.pdf
  8. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retreived 3rd May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_ellis_island_1892_on.pdf
  9. ^ South Australian Register Wednesday 21st February 1855. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) Rodney 1855. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/rodney1855.shtml
  10. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 3rd May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_australia_victoria.pdf
  11. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, April 19). Emigrants to Australia NSW 1860 -88 [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/nsw_passenger_lists_1860_88.pdf
  12. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_West_Indies


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