Lace History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms 

Ireland already had an established system of hereditary surnames when the Strongbownians arrived. Often the two traditions blended together quite well due to some of their basic similarities, but the incoming Anglo-Norman system brought in some forms that were uncommon amongst the Irish. One of these Anglo-Norman anomalies was the prevalence of local surnames, such as Lace. Local names were taken from the names of a place or a geographical feature where the person lived, held land, or was born. Originally, the place names were prefixed by de, which means from in French. This type of prefix was eventually either made a part of the surname if the place name began with a vowel or was eliminated entirely. The local surnames of these Strongbownian invaders referred to places in Normandy, or more typically England, but eventually for those Anglo- Normans that remained in Ireland, the nicknames referred to places or geographical features of the island: they became true local names. The Lace family appears to have originally lived in the settlement of Lassy in the region called Calvados in northern France. The name of this place is derived from the Gaulish personal name Lascius, which is of uncertain origin, and the local suffix -acum. The Gaelic form of the surname Lace is de Léis. However, there is a native Irish family of County Wexford named O Laitheasa who anglicize their surname as Lace. This name, which was originally O Flaithgheasa, is derived from the Gaelic word flaith, which means prince. This was, in most cases, a nickname applied to someone with princely manners or a regal bearing.

Early Origins of the Lace family

The surname Lace was first found in County Limerick (Irish: Luimneach) located in Southwestern Ireland, in the province of Munster, where they had been granted lands by Strongbow after the invasion of Ireland in 1172.

Important Dates for the Lace family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Lace research. Another 107 words (8 lines of text) covering the year 1298 is included under the topic Early Lace History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Lace Spelling Variations

Medieval scribes and church officials often spelled the name Lace as it sounded to them. As a result, the name Lace, over the ages, has attained many spelling variations including Lacey, Lacie, Lacy, de Lacy, Lasey, Lassey and many more.

Early Notables of the Lace family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the family up to this time was Hugo de Lacy of Limerick, as well as Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, who was recorded on the...
Another 27 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Lace Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Lace migration to the United States

Ireland experienced a dramatic decrease in its population during the 19th century. This was in a great measure, a response to England's imperialistic policies. Hunger and disease took the lives of many Irish people and many more chose to leave their homeland to escape the horrific conditions. North America with its promise of work, freedom, and land was an extremely popular destination for Irish families. For those families that survived the journey, all three of these things were often attained through much hard work and perseverance. Research into early immigration and passenger lists revealed many immigrants bearing the name Lace:

Lace Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Inv Lace, who landed in Virginia in 1656 [1]
Lace Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Francis Lace, who arrived in Virginia in 1701 [1]

Contemporary Notables of the name Lace (post 1700)

  • Brigadier Frank Dwyer Lace, Commander Royal Artillery 2nd Canadian Division, North-west Europe (1944-1945) [2]
  • Daniel Lace Quirk (1818-1910), American Democrat politician, Wayne County Auditor, 1852-54; Postmaster at Belleville, Michigan, 1853-54 [3]

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Citations

  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ Generals of World War II. (Retrieved 2011, September 15) Frank Lace. Retrieved from http://generals.dk/general/Lace/Frank_Dwyer/Canada.html
  3. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 8) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
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