Wilkinson History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Wilkinson is an ancient Norman name that arrived in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. The name Wilkinson comes from the Norman personal name Wilkins, which in turn is derived from the name William. William, which is derived from the words will, meaning resolution and helm, meaning armed. [1]

Early Origins of the Wilkinson family

The surname Wilkinson was first found in Durham where they held a family seat from early times. They were descended from Robert de Wintona, of Glamorgan, one of twelve knights who came into Glamorgan with Robert Fitzhamon, a Norman noble, in 1066. Fitzhamon was Sheriff of Kent and founder of Tewkesbury.

"This name is almost entirely confined to the northern half of England, as defined by a line drawn west from the Wash. It is best represented in Northumberland, Durham, Yorkshire, and Lancashire, and is also fairly numerous in Nottinghamshire, Lincolnshire, and Cheshire. " [2]

The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 listed Adam Wylkynson and Thomas Wylkynson. [3]

Early History of the Wilkinson family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Wilkinson research. Another 108 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1250, 1610, 1675, 1566, 1647, 1616, 1690, 1650, 1613 and are included under the topic Early Wilkinson History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Wilkinson Spelling Variations

Anglo-Norman names are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. When the Normans became the ruling people of England in the 11th century, they introduced a new language into a society where the main languages of Old and later Middle English had no definite spelling rules. These languages were more often spoken than written, so they blended freely with one another. Contributing to this mixing of tongues was the fact that medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, ensuring that a person's name would appear differently in nearly every document in which it was recorded. The name has been spelled Wilkinson, Wilkisson, Wilkiesson and others.

Early Notables of the Wilkinson family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Lancelot Wilkinson of Kyo, Durham. Henry Wilkinson (1610-1675), was an English clergyman, Lady Margaret's Professor of Divinity, and member of the Westminster Assembly. He was Canon of Christ Church, Oxford, son of Henry Wilkinson (1566-1647.) Henry Wilkinson (1616-1690), was an English clergyman and academic, Principal of Magdalen...
Another 52 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Wilkinson Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Wilkinson family to Ireland

Some of the Wilkinson family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 59 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Wilkinson migration to the United States +

For many English families, the political and religious disarray that plagued their homeland made the frontiers of the New World an attractive prospect. Thousands migrated, aboard cramped disease-ridden ships. They arrived sick, poor, and hungry, but were welcomed in many cases with far greater opportunity than at home in England. Many of these hardy settlers went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Among early immigrants bearing the name Wilkinson or a variant listed above were:

Wilkinson Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • William Wilkinson, who arrived in Virginia in 1606
  • John Wilkinson, who settled in Salem Massachusetts in 1630
  • Edward Wilkinson, aged 17, who landed in Barbados in 1635 [4]
  • Jane Wilkinson, aged 20, who arrived in Virginia in 1635 [4]
  • Mathew Wilkinson, aged 18, who landed in Barbados in 1635 [4]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Wilkinson Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Grace Wilkinson, who arrived in Virginia in 1702 [4]
  • Alice Wilkinson, who arrived in Carolina in 1724 [4]
  • Mary Wilkinson, who arrived in Boston, Massachusetts in 1767 [4]
  • Daniel Wilkinson, who arrived in New York in 1775 [4]
Wilkinson Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Charles Wilkinson, who landed in America in 1806 [4]
  • Alexander Wilkinson, who landed in Connecticut in 1812 [4]
  • Samuel Wilkinson, aged 29, who arrived in New York in 1812 [4]
  • Richard Wilkinson, aged 38, who arrived in Maine in 1812 [4]
  • John Wilkinson, who landed in Charleston, South Carolina in 1822 [4]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Canada Wilkinson migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Wilkinson Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Henry Wilkinson, who landed in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1749-1752
  • Thomas Wilkinson with his wife and child settled in Nova Scotia in 1774
  • Frans Wilkinson, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1774
  • Mr. John Wilkinson U.E. who arrived at Port Roseway, [Shelburne], Nova Scotia on October 26, 1783 was passenger number 224 aboard the ship "HMS Clinton", picked up on September 28, 1783 at Staten Island, New York, USA [5]
  • Capt. Richard Wilkinson U.E. who settled in Eastern District [Cornwall], Ontario c. 1786 [5]
Wilkinson Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Cornelius Wilkinson was married in St. John's, Newfoundland in 1815 [6]
  • Miss. Sarah Wilkinson who immigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship "Wakefield" departing from the port of Cork, Ireland but died on Grosse Isle on 4th July 1847 [7]

Australia Wilkinson migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Wilkinson Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • John Wilkinson, English convict from Cumberland, who was transported aboard the "Asia" on September 3rd, 1820, settling in New South Wales, Australia [8]
  • James Wilkinson, English convict from York, who was transported aboard the "Asia" on July 29th, 1823, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia [9]
  • Thomas Wilkinson, English convict from Suffolk, who was transported aboard the "Asia" on July 29th, 1823, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia [9]
  • Thomas Wilkinson, a shoemaker, who arrived in Van Diemen’s Land (now Tasmania) sometime between 1825 and 1832
  • Francis Wilkinson, English convict from Norfolk, who was transported aboard the "America" on April 4, 1829, settling in New South Wales, Australia [10]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Wilkinson migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Wilkinson Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • E Wilkinson, who landed in Auckland, New Zealand in 1837
  • Johnson B. Wilkinson, aged 26, a labourer, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Aurora" in 1840
  • Ann Wilkinson, aged 22, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Aurora" in 1840
  • John Wilkinson, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1841 aboard the ship Arab
  • J S Wilkinson, who landed in Kaipara, New Zealand in 1841 aboard the ship "Sophia Pate"
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Wilkinson (post 1700) +

  • Robert Raymond "Bob" Wilkinson (1927-2016), American NFL football end for the New York Giants (1951-1952)
  • Richard Warren "Buzzy" Wilkinson (1932-2016), American NBA basketball player
  • Adrienne Marie Wilkinson (b. 1977), American actress
  • J Harvie Wilkinson III (b. 1944), American judge, chief judge of US Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit (1996-2003)
  • David Todd Wilkinson (1935-2002), American cosmologist, Chairman of the Physics Department at Princeton University (1987-1990)
  • James Wilkinson (1757-1825), American general
  • Sir John Gardiner Wilkinson (1797-1875), English writer and Egyptologist, son of the Rev. John Wilkinson of Hardendale, Westmorland, and descended from Sir Salathiel Lovell; his father was a member of the African Exploration Society and a fellow of the Society of Antiquaries [11]
  • Tate Wilkinson (1739-1803), English actor, son of the Rev. John Wilkinson [11]
  • John Wilkinson (1728-1808), English ironmaster, the ‘father of the south Staffordshire iron trade,’ born at Clifton, Cumberland [11]
  • James John Garth Wilkinson (1812-1899), English Swedenborgian, born in London, in Acton Street, Gray's Inn Lane, on 3 June 1812, the eldest son of James John Wilkinson (d. 1845), eldest son of Martin Wilkinson of the city of Durham [11]
  • ... (Another 17 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

HMAS Sydney II
HMS Hood
  • Mr. Stanley Wilkinson (b. 1919), English Leading Seaman serving for the Royal Navy from Bradford, Yorkshire, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [13]
  • Mr. James W Wilkinson (b. 1918), English Stoker 1st Class serving for the Royal Navy from East Retford, Nottinghamshire, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [13]
  • Mr. Frederick J R Wilkinson (b. 1924), English Boy 1st Class serving for the Royal Navy from Huthwaite, Nottinghamshire, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [13]
HMS Prince of Wales
  • Mr. Robert Wilkinson, English Turret Sweeper, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking [14]
  • Mr. Sydney Wilkinson, British Chief Stoker, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and died in the sinking [14]
  • Mr. Roy Wilkinson, British Officer Steward, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking [14]
  • Mr. Robert Wilkinson, English Able Seaman from England, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking [14]
  • Mr. Paul Laurence Wilkinson, British Able Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and died in the sinking [14]
  • ... (Another 1 entries are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
HMS Repulse
  • Mr. Roy Wilkinson, British Petty Officer, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and survived the sinking [15]
HMS Royal Oak
  • Anthony P. Wilkinson, British Paymaster Lieutenant with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk; he survived the sinking [16]
  • Joseph Wilkinson (1923-1939), British Boy 1st Class with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk; he died in the sinking [16]
RMS Lusitania
  • Mr. James Wilkinson, English Engineers’ Mess Steward from Walton, Liverpool, England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking [17]
RMS Titanic
  • Miss Elizabeth Anne Wilkinson, (alias Mrs. Elizabeth Faunthorpe), aged 29, English Second Class passenger from Manchester, England who sailed aboard the RMS Titanic and survived the sinking escaping on life boat 16 [18]


The Wilkinson Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Non mihi sed tibi gloria
Motto Translation: Glory to thee, not to me.


Suggested Readings for the name Wilkinson +

  • 219 The Descendants of the Rev. Christopher Wilkinson of Queen Anne's County, Maryland by George B. Wilson, The Gatson, Howard, and Wilkinson Families by Kathleen Wilkinson Wood.

  1. ^ Arthur, William , An Etymological Dictionary of Family and Christian Names. London: 1857. Print
  2. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  3. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  4. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  5. ^ Rubincam, Milton. The Old United Empire Loyalists List. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1976. (Originally published as; United Empire Loyalists. The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada. Rose Publishing Company, 1885.) ISBN 0-8063-0331-X
  6. ^ Seary E.R., Family Names of the Island of Newfoundland, Montreal: McGill's-Queen's Universtity Press 1998 ISBN 0-7735-1782-0
  7. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 60)
  8. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2016, October 27) Asia 1 voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1820 with 192 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/asia/1820
  9. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2016, October 27) Asia 1 voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1823 with 151 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/asia/1823
  10. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2014, November 26) America voyage to New South Wales, Australia in 1829 with 176 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/america/1829
  11. ^ Wikisource contributors. "Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900." Wikisource . Wikisource , 4 Jun. 2018. Web. 4 Feb. 2019
  12. ^ HMAS Sydney II, Finding Sydney Foundation - Roll of Honour. (Retrieved 2014, April 24) . Retrieved from http://www.findingsydney.com/roll.asp
  13. ^ H.M.S. Hood Association-Battle Cruiser Hood: Crew Information - H.M.S. Hood Rolls of Honour, Men Lost in the Sinking of H.M.S. Hood, 24th May 1941. (Retrieved 2016, July 15) . Retrieved from http://www.hmshood.com/crew/memorial/roh_24may41.htm
  14. ^ HMS Prince of Wales Crew members. (Retrieved 2014, April 9) . Retrieved from http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listprincecrew.html
  15. ^ HMS Repulse Crew members. (Retrieved 2014, April 9) . Retrieved from http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listrepulsecrew.html
  16. ^ Ships hit by U-boats crew list HMS Royal Oak (08) - (Retrieved 2018 February, 9th) - retrieved from https://uboat.net/allies/merchants/crews/ship68.html
  17. ^ Lusitania Passenger List - The Lusitania Resource. (Retrieved 2014, March 7) . Retrieved from http://www.rmslusitania.info/lusitania-passenger-list/
  18. ^ Titanic Passenger List - Titanic Facts. (Retrieved 2016, July 13) . Retrieved from http://www.titanicfacts.net/titanic-passenger-list.html


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