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Wellsh History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



With the arrival of the Norman invasion of Ireland in the 11th century came new naming traditions to the eastern region of Ireland. These new naming traditions actually meshed fairly well with the pre-existing Irish traditions. Both cultures made significant use of hereditary surnames. And like the native Irish, the Strongbownians often used prefixes to build patronymic surnames, which are names based on the given name of the initial bearer's father or another older relative. Strongbow's followers often created names that were built with the prefix Fitz-, which was derived from the French word fils, and ultimately from the Latin filius, both of which mean son. They also used diminutive suffixes such as -ot, -et, -un, -in, or -el, and occasionally even two suffixes combined to form a double diminutive such as -el-in, -el-ot, -in-ot, and -et-in, to build patronymic names. The surname Wellsh is derived from Breat(h)nach which literally means Welshman. Phillip Brenagh, known as "Phillip the Welshman" was likely the progenitor of the family. Phillip and his brother David arrived with Strongbow, in 1170.

Early Origins of the Wellsh family


The surname Wellsh was first found in Counties Kilkenny, Leix, and Waterford, in Ireland, where they held a family seat from 1170.

Early History of the Wellsh family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Wellsh research.
Another 257 words (18 lines of text) covering the years 1170, 1606, 1615, 1618, 1688, 1604, 1580, 1654, 1618 and 1688 are included under the topic Early Wellsh History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Wellsh Spelling Variations


Church officials and medieval scribes often simply spelled names as they sounded. As a result, a single person's name may have been recorded a dozen different ways during his lifetime. Spelling variations for the name Wellsh include: Walsh, Welsh, Welch, Brannagh and others.

Early Notables of the Wellsh family (pre 1700)


Notable amongst the family up to this time was Rev. Peter Walsh (1618-1688), who wrote "The Loyal Remonstrance"; for which he was excommunicated from the Franciscan Order; John Walsh...
Another 29 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Wellsh Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Wellsh family to the New World and Oceana


The Irish emigration during the late 18th and 19th century contributed to the melting pot of nationalities in North America, and the building of a whole new era of industry and commerce in what was seen as a rich, new land. Ireland's Great Potato Famine resulted in the worst economic and social conditions in the island's history. And in response to the hunger, disease, and poverty, during this decade the total number of emigrants to leave for North America rivaled all the previous years combined. Those from this decade that arrived on North American shores were not warmly welcomed by the established population, but they were vital to the rapid development of the industry, agriculture, and infrastructure of the infant nations of the United States and what would become Canada. Research into early immigration and passenger lists has shown many people bearing the name Wellsh: Jacob Walsh who settled in Boston Massachusetts in 1635; Thomas Walsh settled in Virginia in 1643; John Walsh settled in St. John's, Newfoundland, in 1756.

The Wellsh Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Transfixus sed non mortuus
Motto Translation: Transfixed but not dead.


Wellsh Family Crest Products



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