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Warwant History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The name Warwant was brought to England by the Normans when they conquered the country in 1066. The ancestors of the Warwant family lived in Sussex. Their name, however, is a reference to Varrenne, Normandy, the family's place of residence prior to the Norman Conquest of England in 1066. Despite this name's resemblance to the Germanic Guarin, often translated as Warin, the names are not thought to be related.

Early Origins of the Warwant family


The surname Warwant was first found in Sussex, Surrey, Norfolk and Suffolk where William de Warene, or Warrena married Gundard, a daughter of William the Conqueror, received great possessions and later became progenitor of the Earls of Warenne and Surrey. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
Poynton in Chester, "anciently called Ponynton and Poynington, remained in the possession of the male line of the family of Warren from the reign of Edward III. till the year 1801, when it terminated in Sir George Warren, K.B., from whose daughter, Viscountess Bulkeley, the manor passed by will to the Hon. Frances Maria Warren, afterwards Lady Vernon, who was succeeded by her son the present lord. " [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Early History of the Warwant family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Warwant research.
Another 323 words (23 lines of text) covering the years 1138, 1148, 1399, 1563, 1609, 1580, 1628 and 1620 are included under the topic Early Warwant History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Warwant Spelling Variations


The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries. For that reason, spelling variations are common among many Anglo-Norman names. The shape of the English language was frequently changed with the introduction of elements of Norman French, Latin, and other European languages; even the spelling of literate people's names were subsequently modified. Warwant has been recorded under many different variations, including Warren, Warrene and others.

Early Notables of the Warwant family (pre 1700)


Another 29 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Warwant Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Warwant family to Ireland


Some of the Warwant family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 93 words (7 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Warwant family to the New World and Oceana


To escape the uncertainty of the political and religious uncertainty found in England, many English families boarded ships at great expense to sail for the colonies held by Britain. The passages were expensive, though, and the boats were unsafe, overcrowded, and ridden with disease. Those who were hardy and lucky enough to make the passage intact were rewarded with land, opportunity, and social environment less prone to religious and political persecution. Many of these families went on to be important contributors to the young nations of Canada and the United States where they settled. Warwants were some of the first of the immigrants to arrive in North America: Abigail Warren and Anna Warren, who both came to Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1623; John Warren, his wife Margaret and their four children, who arrived in Watertown, MA in 1630.

The Warwant Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Leo de juda est robur nostrum
Motto Translation: The Lion of Judah is our strength.


Warwant Family Crest Products



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Citations


  1. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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