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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright © 2000 - 2017


Trublefield is a name of ancient Norman origin. It arrived in England with the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Trublefield family lived in Breconshire, Wales. Their name, however, is a reference to Turberville, Normandy, the family's place of residence prior to the Norman Conquest of England in 1066.

Coity Castle (Welsh: Castell Coety) in Glamorgan, Wales is a Norman castle built by Sir Payn "the Demon" de Turberville ( fl. 1126), one of the legendary Twelve Knights of Glamorgan.

Crickhowell Castle in Crickhowell, Wales (now in ruins) was initially a motte and bailey castle built from around 1121, probably by Robert Turberville, a tenant of the Marcher lord Bernard de Neufmarché.

Trublefield Early Origins



The surname Trublefield was first found in Breconshire where they were granted lands by William the Conqueror for their assistance at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 A.D. One of the first records of the surname was William de Turbeville (William Turbe), (c. 1095-1174), a medieval Bishop of Norwich. An important branch of the family was found at Anstey in Wiltshire in early times. "Here was a commandery of the Knights Hospitallers, founded by Walter de Tuberville in the reign of John." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
Later, Sir Henry de Turberville (died 1239) was a noted English soldier and seneschal of Gascony from 1226 to 1231. A Devon man, he was reappointed seneschal of Gascony on 23 May 1234 and held the position until November 1238. He was known as strong fighter for the cause.

According to legend, a ghostly coach crosses the bridge by Woolbridge Manor near Wool, Dorset at night, but only those with Turberville blood can see it. One version claims the coach contains the ghosts of John Turberville of Woolbridge and Anne, the daughter of Thomas Howard, 1st Viscount Howard of Bindon on their elopement.

The d'Urberville family in Thomas Hardy's novel Tess of the d'Urbervilles, was based on the mediaeval Turberville family of Bere Regis, Dorset.


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Trublefield Spelling Variations


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Trublefield Spelling Variations



Multitudes of spelling variations are a hallmark of Anglo Norman names. Most of these names evolved in the 11th and 12th century, in the time after the Normans introduced their own Norman French language into a country where Old and Middle English had no spelling rules and the languages of the court were French and Latin. To make matters worse, medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, so names frequently appeared differently in the various documents in which they were recorded. The name was spelled Turbeyfield, Turberfield, Turbervile, Turbervill, Turberville and many more.

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Trublefield Early History


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Trublefield Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Trublefield research. Another 250 words (18 lines of text) covering the years 1549, 1568, 1540, 1597, 1648, 1681, 1559, 1555, 1648 and 1681 are included under the topic Early Trublefield History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Trublefield Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Trublefield Early Notables (pre 1700)



Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir Thomas Turberville. George Turberville, or Turbervile (1540 -1597) was an English poet, second son of Nicholas Turberville of Whitchurch, Dorset, the same Dorset family, the D'Urbervilles of Mr Thomas Hardy's novel, Tess of the d'Urbervilles; and Edward Turberville or Turbervile (c. 1648-1681)...

Another 69 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Trublefield Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Trublefield In Ireland


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Trublefield In Ireland



Some of the Trublefield family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 74 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Because of this political and religious unrest within English society, many people decided to immigrate to the colonies. Families left for Ireland, North America, and Australia in enormous numbers, travelling at high cost in extremely inhospitable conditions. The New World in particular was a desirable destination, but the long voyage caused many to arrive sick and starving. Those who made it, though, were welcomed by opportunities far greater than they had known at home in England. Many of these families went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Trublefield or a variant listed above: Mr. Turberville who landed in America in 1670.

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Trublefield Family Crest Products


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Trublefield Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Other References

  1. Magnusson, Magnus. Chambers Biographical Dictionary 5th edition. Edinburgh: W & R Chambers, 1990. Print.
  2. Virkus, Frederick A. Ed. Immigrant Ancestors A List of 2,500 Immigrants to America Before 1750. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1964. Print.
  3. Leeson, Francis L. Dictionary of British Peerages. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1986. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-1121-5).
  4. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
  5. Reaney P.H and R.M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X).
  6. Markale, J. Celtic Civilization. London: Gordon & Cremonesi, 1976. Print.
  7. Zieber, Eugene. Heraldry in America. Philadelphia: Genealogical Publishing Co. Print.
  8. Thirsk, Joan. The Agrarian History of England and Wales. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press: 7 Volumes. Print.
  9. Hinde, Thomas Ed. The Domesday Book England's Heritage Then and Now. Surrey: Colour Library Books, 1995. Print. (ISBN 1-85833-440-3).
  10. Shirley, Evelyn Philip. Noble and Gentle Men of England Or Notes Touching The Arms and Descendants of the Ancient Knightley and Gentle Houses of England Arranged in their Respective Counties 3rd Edition. Westminster: John Bowyer Nichols and Sons, 1866. Print.
  11. ...

The Trublefield Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Trublefield Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 9 February 2017 at 07:40.

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