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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2017


The ancestors of the Tagge family were part of an ancient Scottish tribe called the Picts. The name Tagge is derived from priest. Although the marriage of clerics in minor orders was permitted, the marriage of priests was banned during the 12th century. The Gaelic form of the name is Mac-an-t-sagairt, which means son of the priest.

Tagge Early Origins



The surname Tagge was first found in Ross-shire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Rois) a former county, now part of the Council Areas of Highland and Western Isles in Northern Scotland, which emerged from the Gaelic lordship of the Earl of Ross, where they held a family seat from early times and their first records appeared on the early census rolls taken by the early Kings of Scotland to determine the rate of taxation of their subjects.

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Tagge Spelling Variations


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Tagge Spelling Variations



The appearance of the printing press and the first dictionaries in the last few hundred years did much to standardize spelling. Prior to that time scribes spelled according to sound, a practice that resulted in many spelling variations. Tagge has been spelled MacTaggart, MacTagart, MacIntaggart, MacTuggart, MacToggart, MacTaggert, MacTeggart, Taggart, Tagart, Tegart, Tegert, Teggert, Teggart, Intaggart, Tuggart and many more.

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Tagge Early History


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Tagge Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Tagge research. Another 301 words (22 lines of text) covering the years 1215, 1544 and 1678 are included under the topic Early Tagge History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Tagge Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Tagge Early Notables (pre 1700)



More information is included under the topic Early Tagge Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Tagge In Ireland


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Tagge In Ireland



Some of the Tagge family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 135 words (10 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



The expense of the crossing to the North American colonies seemed small beside the difficulties of remaining in Scotland. It was a long and hard trip, but at its end lay the reward of freedom. Some Scots remained faithful to England and called themselves United Empire Loyalists, while others fought in the American War of Independence. Much of this lost Scottish heritage has been recovered in the last century through Clan societies and other patriotic Scottish organizations. A search of immigration and passenger lists revealed many important, early immigrants to North America bearing the name of Tagge: Hugh, James, Mathew, Peter McTaggart all arrived in Philadelphia between 1840 and 1860; Charles, Hugh, James, Thomas and William McTaggert all arrived in Philadelphia between 1840 and 1860.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Ratione non vi
Motto Translation: By reason, not by force.


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Tagge Family Crest Products


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Tagge Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



    Other References

    1. Filby, P. William and Mary K Meyer. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index in Four Volumes. Detroit: Gale Research, 1985. Print. (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8).
    2. Fulton, Alexander. Scotland and Her Tartans: The Romantic Heritage of the Scottish Clans and Families. Godalming: Bramley, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-86283-880-0).
    3. Barrow, G.W.S Ed. The Charters of David I The Written Acts of David I King of Scots, 1124-53 and of His Son Henry, Earl of Northumerland, 1139-52. Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, 1999. Print.
    4. Skene, William Forbes Edition. Chronicles of the Picts, Chronicles of the Scots and Other Early Memorials of Scottish History. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1867. Print.
    5. Innes, Thomas and Learney. Socts Heraldry A Practical Handbook on the Historical Principles and Modern Application of the Art of Science. London: Oliver and Boyd, 1934. Print.
    6. Hinde, Thomas Ed. The Domesday Book England's Heritage Then and Now. Surrey: Colour Library Books, 1995. Print. (ISBN 1-85833-440-3).
    7. Best, Hugh. Debrett's Texas Peerage. New York: Coward-McCann, 1983. Print. (ISBN 069811244X).
    8. Bradford, William. History of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647 Edited by Samuel Eliot Morrison 2 Volumes. New York: Russell and Russell, 1968. Print.
    9. Markale, J. Celtic Civilization. London: Gordon & Cremonesi, 1976. Print.
    10. Leyburn, James Graham. The Scotch-Irish A Social History. Chapel Hill: UNC Press, 1962. Print. (ISBN 0807842591).
    11. ...

    The Tagge Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Tagge Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

    This page was last modified on 20 January 2013 at 11:30.

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