Taggart History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Picts were the ancient Scottish tribe where the ancestors of the Taggart family lived. The name Taggart comes from priest. Although the marriage of clerics in minor orders was permitted, the marriage of priests was banned during the 12th century. The Gaelic form of the name is Mac-an-t-sagairt, which means son of the priest.

Early Origins of the Taggart family

The surname Taggart was first found in Ross-shire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Rois) a former county, now part of the Council Areas of Highland and Western Isles in Northern Scotland, which emerged from the Gaelic lordship of the Earl of Ross, where they held a family seat from early times and their first records appeared on the early census rolls taken by the early Kings of Scotland to determine the rate of taxation of their subjects.

Early History of the Taggart family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Taggart research. Another 151 words (11 lines of text) covering the years 1215, 1544 and 1678 are included under the topic Early Taggart History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Taggart Spelling Variations

When the first dictionaries were invented in the last few hundred years, spelling gradually became standardized. Before that time, scribes spelled according to sound. Names were often recorded under different spelling variations every time they were written. Taggart has been written MacTaggart, MacTagart, MacIntaggart, MacTuggart, MacToggart, MacTaggert, MacTeggart, Taggart, Tagart, Tegart, Tegert, Teggert, Teggart, Intaggart, Tuggart and many more.

Early Notables of the Taggart family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Taggart Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Taggart family to Ireland

Some of the Taggart family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 72 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Taggart migration to the United States +

The crossing to North America did not seem so great in comparison with the hardships many Scots endured at home. It was long, expensive, and cramped, but also rewarding. North America offered land and the chance for settlers to prove themselves in a new place. And many did prove themselves as they fought to forge a new nation in the American War of Independence. The ancestors of those Scots can now experience much of their once-lost heritage through the Clan societies and highland games that have sprung up across North America in the last century. A search of immigration and passenger lists revealed many important, early immigrants to North America bearing the name of Taggart:

Taggart Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Hugh Taggart, who landed in New England in 1723 [1]
  • Archibald Taggart, who landed in New England in 1738 [1]
Taggart Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Jane Taggart, aged 12, who landed in Baltimore, Maryland in 1804 [1]
  • Ann Taggart, aged 14, who arrived in Baltimore, Maryland in 1804 [1]
  • Bryan Taggart, who landed in New York, NY in 1812 [1]
  • William Taggart, who landed in New York, NY in 1816 [1]
  • John Taggart, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1816 [1]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Australia Taggart migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Taggart Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Michael Taggart, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "William Nicol" in 1840 [2]
  • Catherine Taggart, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "William Nicol" in 1840 [2]
  • Mary Taggart, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "William Nicol" in 1840 [2]
  • John Taggart, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "William Nicol" in 1840 [2]
  • Margaret Taggart, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "William Nicol" in 1840 [2]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Taggart migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Taggart Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Peter Taggart, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Oliver Lang" in 1858
  • Mrs. Mary Taggart, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Harwood" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 4th November 1858 [3]
  • Mr. Patrick Taggart, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Harwood" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 4th November 1858 [3]
  • Mr. Thomas Taggart, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Harwood" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 4th November 1858 [3]
  • Mr. Robert Taggart, (b. 1853), aged 21, Irish farm labourer, from County Tyrone travelling from Glasgow aboard the ship "Oamaru" arriving in Port Chalmers, Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 17th February 1875 [4]

Contemporary Notables of the name Taggart (post 1700) +

  • Willie Taggart (b. 1976), American head college football at the University of South Florida
  • Thomas Taggart (1856-1929), Irish-born, American politician, 18th Mayor of Indianapolis (1895-1901), United States Senator in 1916
  • Millee Taggart (b. 1940), American two-time Daytime Emmy Award winning and three-time Writers Guild of America Award winning actress, writer and producer, best known for her long-running role as Janet Bergman Collins on Search for Tomorrow (1971-1982)
  • Scott Taggart (b. 1991), Scottish footballer
  • Adam Taggart (b. 1993), Australian footballer
  • Tamara Taggart (b. 1968), Canadian television presenter and anchor of CTV News at Six
  • Samuel Taggart (1754-1825), American politician, Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Massachusetts (1803-1817)
  • Joseph Taggart (1867-1938), American politician, United States congressman for Kansas (1911-1917)
  • Gerrald "Gerry" Taggart (b. 1970), English former professional footballer
  • Jeremy Taggart (b. 1977), Canadian drummer for the band Our Lady Peace

HMS Hood
  • Mr. Robert Taggart (b. 1917), Scottish Assistant Cook (S) serving for the Royal Navy from Uphall, West Lothian, Scotland, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [5]


The Taggart Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Ratione non vi
Motto Translation: By reason, not by force.


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) WILLIAM NICOL. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1840WilliamNichol.htm
  3. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  4. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  5. ^ H.M.S. Hood Association-Battle Cruiser Hood: Crew Information - H.M.S. Hood Rolls of Honour, Men Lost in the Sinking of H.M.S. Hood, 24th May 1941. (Retrieved 2016, July 15) . Retrieved from http://www.hmshood.com/crew/memorial/roh_24may41.htm


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