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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2017


The chronicle of the name Tagg begins with a family in the Pictish clans of ancient Scotland. The name is derived from priest. Although the marriage of clerics in minor orders was permitted, the marriage of priests was banned during the 12th century. The Gaelic form of the name is Mac-an-t-sagairt, which means son of the priest.

Tagg Early Origins



The surname Tagg was first found in Ross-shire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Rois) a former county, now part of the Council Areas of Highland and Western Isles in Northern Scotland, which emerged from the Gaelic lordship of the Earl of Ross, where they held a family seat from early times and their first records appeared on the early census rolls taken by the early Kings of Scotland to determine the rate of taxation of their subjects.

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Tagg Spelling Variations


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Tagg Spelling Variations



When the first dictionaries were invented in the last few hundred years, spelling gradually became standardized. Before that time, scribes spelled according to sound. Names were often recorded under different spelling variations every time they were written. Tagg has been written MacTaggart, MacTagart, MacIntaggart, MacTuggart, MacToggart, MacTaggert, MacTeggart, Taggart, Tagart, Tegart, Tegert, Teggert, Teggart, Intaggart, Tuggart and many more.

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Tagg Early History


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Tagg Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Tagg research. Another 301 words (22 lines of text) covering the years 1215, 1544 and 1678 are included under the topic Early Tagg History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Tagg Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Tagg Early Notables (pre 1700)



More information is included under the topic Early Tagg Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Tagg In Ireland


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Tagg In Ireland



Some of the Tagg family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 135 words (10 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Tagg Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • Maria Tagg, aged 19, a domestic servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1859 aboard the ship "North"

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Ratione non vi
Motto Translation: By reason, not by force.


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Tagg Family Crest Products


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Tagg Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



    Other References

    1. Papworth, J.W and A.W Morant. Ordinary of British Armorials. London: T.Richards, 1874. Print.
    2. Moncrieffe, Sir Ian of That Ilk and David Hicks. The Highland Clans The Dynastic Origins, Cheifs and Background of the Clans. New York: C.N. Potter, 1968. Print.
    3. Skordas, Guest. Ed. The Early Settlers of Maryland an Index to Names or Immigrants Complied from Records of Land Patents 1633-1680 in the Hall of Records Annapolis, Maryland. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1968. Print.
    4. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Walter Lee Sheppard and David Faris. Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England Between 1623 and 1650 7th Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0806313676).
    5. Hinde, Thomas Ed. The Domesday Book England's Heritage Then and Now. Surrey: Colour Library Books, 1995. Print. (ISBN 1-85833-440-3).
    6. Moncrieffe, Sir Ian of That Ilk and Don Pottinger. Clan Map Scotland of Old. Edinburgh: Bartholomew and Son, 1983. Print.
    7. Samuelsen, W. David. New York City Passenger List Manifests Index 1820 - 1824. North Salt Lake, Utah: Accelerated Indexing Systems International, 1986. Print.
    8. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
    9. Leyburn, James Graham. The Scotch-Irish A Social History. Chapel Hill: UNC Press, 1962. Print. (ISBN 0807842591).
    10. The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X).
    11. ...

    The Tagg Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Tagg Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

    This page was last modified on 20 January 2013 at 11:30.

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