Tagg History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The chronicle of the name Tagg begins with a family in the Pictish clans of ancient Scotland. The name is derived from priest. Although the marriage of clerics in minor orders was permitted, the marriage of priests was banned during the 12th century. The Gaelic form of the name is Mac-an-t-sagairt, which means son of the priest.

Early Origins of the Tagg family

The surname Tagg was first found in Ross-shire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Rois) a former county, now part of the Council Areas of Highland and Western Isles in Northern Scotland, which emerged from the Gaelic lordship of the Earl of Ross, where they held a family seat from early times and their first records appeared on the early census rolls taken by the early Kings of Scotland to determine the rate of taxation of their subjects.

Early History of the Tagg family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Tagg research. Another 151 words (11 lines of text) covering the years 1215, 1544 and 1678 are included under the topic Early Tagg History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Tagg Spelling Variations

When the first dictionaries were invented in the last few hundred years, spelling gradually became standardized. Before that time, scribes spelled according to sound. Names were often recorded under different spelling variations every time they were written. Tagg has been written MacTaggart, MacTagart, MacIntaggart, MacTuggart, MacToggart, MacTaggert, MacTeggart, Taggart, Tagart, Tegart, Tegert, Teggert, Teggart, Intaggart, Tuggart and many more.

Early Notables of the Tagg family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Tagg Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Tagg family to Ireland

Some of the Tagg family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 72 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


Australia Tagg migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Tagg Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. John Tagg, British convict who was convicted in Middlesex, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Calcutta" in February 1803, arriving in New South Wales, Australia [1]
  • Maria Tagg, aged 19, a domestic servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1859 aboard the ship "North"

Contemporary Notables of the name Tagg (post 1700) +

  • Michael John Tagg (b. 1946), British silver medalist long-distance runner from East Runton, Norfolk in the 10,000 metres at the 1969 European Championships


The Tagg Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Ratione non vi
Motto Translation: By reason, not by force.


  1. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 25th November 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/calcutta


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