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Swynford History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms




Early Origins of the Swynford family


The surname Swynford was first found in Leicestershire at Swinford, a parish, in the union of Lutterworth, hundred of Guthlaxton [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
where Geoffrey de Swinford was listed in the Pipe Rolls of 1190.

While this is the first listing others quickly followed in other shires and counties including: William de Swyneford in the Feet of Fines of Lancashire in 1250 and Roger de Swyneford in the Subsidy Rolls of Warwickshire in 1332. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)

Catherine Swynford (1350?-1403), Duchess of Lancaster was mistress and third wife of John of Gaunt. "Her elder sister, Philippa, is somewhat doubtfully said to have been the wife of Geoffrey Chaucer, the poet, and by him mother of Thomas Chaucer. " [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print

As a place name Swinford can be found in the aforementioned Leicestershire, Berkshire, Oxfordshire and Staffordshire. The latter has had the largest population over the years. Literally the place name means: "pig ford," from the Old English "swin" + "ford." [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)

The Leicestershire parish was listed in the Domesday Book as Svineford [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
and the oldest listing was found in Oxfordshire as Swynford in 931; in other words it was a Saxon village before the Conquest.

Alternatively, the name could have been derived from the village of Swinfield, now known as Swingfield. Richard de Swinfield or Swynfield (died 1317) was "Bishop of Hereford, [and] took his name from the village of Swinfield, now called Swingfield, five miles north of Folkestone in Kent, where he is generally supposed to have been born. His lifelong interest in Kent, and the large number of Kentish names among his following as bishop of Hereford, attest his abiding attachment to this county. " [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print


Early History of the Swynford family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Swynford research.
Another 101 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1190, 1250, 1613, 1694, 1645, 1648, 1659, 1640, 1694, 1612 and 1659 are included under the topic Early Swynford History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Swynford Spelling Variations


Spelling variations of this family name include: Swinford, Swynford, Swinforde, Swynforte, Swinfort, Swynfort, Swinfen, Swinhoe, Swinhoe, Swinfin and many more.

Early Notables of the Swynford family (pre 1700)


Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Richard Swinfen, of Swinfen, Staffordshire; and his son, John Swinfen (1613-1694), an English politician, Member of Parliament for Stafford (1645-1648) and Tamworth in 1659. John Swynfen, also known as the 'Great Swynfen', was a Presbyterian Member...
Another 42 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Swynford Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Swynford family to the New World and Oceana


Some of the first settlers of this family name or some of its variants were: settlers were recorded from the mid 17th century in the great migration from Europe. Migrants settled in the eastern seaboard from Newfoundland, to Maine, to Florida, and to the islands..

Swynford Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  3. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  4. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  5. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)


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