Stratton History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Stratton reached England in the great wave of migration following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Stratton family lived in Wiltshire, at Stratton. However, there are also parishes in Cornwall, Dorset, Gloucestershire, Norfolk, Buckinghamshire, Hampshire, and Somerset also named Stratton.

The reason for the many parishes so named is because of the etymology of the surname as in "one who came from Stratton (homestead on a Roman road.)" [1] However down in Cornwall, in Cornish the name literally means "the hill full of fresh springs." [2]

Early Origins of the Stratton family

The surname Stratton was first found in Wiltshire where it is said that the notorious Adam de Stratton derives from Argouges from Manche in the arrondisement of Avranches in Normandy.

Adam de Stratton (died 1292) was a royal moneylender, administrator and clergyman under Edward I of England. He rose to become Chamberlain of the Exchequer and steward of Isabella, Countess of Devon. His father was Thomas de Argoges, or Arwillis, of Stratton St Margaret in Wiltshire. In 1278, he was accused of cutting off the seal of a charter from Quarr Abbey, thereby invalidating its authenticity. This was not the beginning nor the last time he would be associated with dubious activities. On 17 January 1290, he was relieved of his office of chamberlain, along with his temporal possessions. Upon his arrest, he was discovered to have in his possession a vast sum of money and objects associated with witchcraft. He was imprisoned in the Tower of London in 1292 and died by 14 August 1294.

Stratton is a parish in Cornwall in the deanery of Trigg-Major, and in the hundred to which this parish imparts its name. "This circumstance denotes its great antiquity, and discovers that in former ages it presented no contemptible figure on the rolls of fame." [3]

Robert de Stretton (died 1385), an English divine, born at Stretton Magna, Leicestershire was Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield and son of Robert Eyryk or de Stretton. "He and his elder brother, Sir William Eyryk, knight (ancestor of the Heyricks of Leicestershire), derived their surnames from Stretton Magna. " [4]

Early History of the Stratton family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Stratton research. Another 175 words (12 lines of text) covering the years 1285, 1320 and 1364 are included under the topic Early Stratton History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Stratton Spelling Variations

Before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago, spelling variations of names were a common occurrence. Elements of Latin, Norman French and other languages became incorporated into English throughout the Middle Ages, and name spellings changed even among the literate. The variations of the surname Stratton include Stratton, Straton, Straiton and others.

Early Notables of the Stratton family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Stratton Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Stratton migration to the United States +

In England at this time, the uncertainty of the political and religious environment of the time caused many families to board ships for distant British colonies in the hopes of finding land and opportunity, and escaping persecution. The voyages were expensive, crowded, and difficult, though, and many arrived in North America sick, starved, and destitute. Those who did make it, however, were greeted with greater opportunities and freedoms that they could have experienced at home. Many of those families went on to make important contributions to the young nations in which they settled. Early immigration records have shown some of the first Strattons to arrive on North American shores:

Stratton Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Joseph Stratton, who settled in Maine in 1623
  • Samuel Stratton, who landed in Watertown, Massachusetts in 1633 [5]
  • Henry Stratton, who settled in Virginia in 1641
  • Henry Stratton, who arrived in Virginia in 1641 [5]
  • Sisley Stratton, who landed in Virginia in 1646 [5]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Stratton Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Thomas Stratton, who arrived in Virginia in 1701 [5]
  • Benja Stratton, who arrived in Virginia in 1703 [5]
  • Joyce Stratton, who landed in Virginia in 1705 [5]
Stratton Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Joseph Stratton, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1829 [5]
  • James Stratton, aged 4, who landed in New York, NY in 1834 [5]
  • J C Stratton, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1850 [5]
  • C Stratton, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1851 [5]
  • David Stratton, who arrived in Mississippi in 1874 [5]

Canada Stratton migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Stratton Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • John Stratton, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1749
  • John Stratton, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • Samuel Stratton, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • Francis Stratton, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • James Stratton, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1750
Stratton Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Mary Ann Stratton from Yorkshire settled in Greenspond, Newfoundland before 1856 [6]

Australia Stratton migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Stratton Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Ms. Mary Stratton, Cornish settler convicted in Cornwall, UK on 6th August 1804, sentenced for 7 years, transported aboard the ship "William Pitt" on 10th August 1805 to New South Wales, Australia [7]
  • John Stratton, English convict from Bedford, who was transported aboard the "Albion" on May 29, 1828, settling in New South Wales, Australia [8]
  • Rosinna E. Stratton, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Susannah" in 1849 [9]

New Zealand Stratton migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Stratton Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • George Stratton, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840
  • Thomas Stratton, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1841 aboard the ship Lady Nugent
  • Thomas Stratton, aged 45, a labourer, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Lady Nugent" in 1841
  • Elizabeth Stratton, aged 35, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Lady Nugent" in 1841
  • George Stratton, aged 15, a labourer, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Lady Nugent" in 1841
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Stratton (post 1700) +

  • Lois J. Stratton (1927-2020), American politician in the state of Washington
  • David Michael Stratton (1941-2020), American professional football player who was a linebacker in the American Football League
  • Bruce Nelson "Dr. Bruce" Stratton (d. 2018), American broadcaster, Station Manager of Corpus Christi's KFTX "Real Country" radio
  • Harold Meade "Harry" Stratton (1879-1962), American engineer and businessman, co-founder and chairman of the Briggs & Stratton engine manufacturers
  • Dorothy Constance Stratton (1899-2006), American director of the SPARS, the United States Coast Guard Women's Reserve during World War II, eponym of the USCGC Stratton (WMSL-752)
  • Solomon Stratton (1745-1818), American soldier and explorer
  • Winfield Scott "W.C." Stratton (1848-1902), American prospector and philanthropist, he discovered the Independence Lode near Victor, Colorado
  • Samuel Somerville Stratton (1898-1969), American academic, 11th President of Middlebury College (1943-1963)
  • Richard A. Stratton (b. 1958), American educator, President of Clearwater Christian College in 2002
  • Felton Stratton (1895-1974), American baseball infielder in the Negro Leagues, active 1920 through 1933
  • ... (Another 54 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Empress of Ireland
  • Mrs. Lucilla Stratton, née Kennerley British Stewardess from United Kingdom who worked aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [10]
Halifax Explosion
  • Master Willie  Stratton (1912-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [11]
  • Mrs. Winifred  Stratton (1882-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [11]
  • Mr. James William  Stratton (1883-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [11]
  • Master Vincie  Stratton (1914-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [11]
  • Master Alfred  Stratton (1905-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [11]
  • ... (Another 1 entries are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
USS Arizona
  • Mr. Donald G. Stratton, American Seaman First Class working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he survived the sinking [12]
  • Mr. John Raymond Stratton, American Seaman First Class from Indiana, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [12]


The Stratton Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Resurgere tento
Motto Translation: I strive to rise again.


Suggested Readings for the name Stratton +

  • 1343 Lackey, Stratton, and Allied Families by Harriett I. Pratt, The Stratton Clan by Gertrude Kratzer Rosenkild, I'm Claiming the Promise by David C. Stratton.

  1. ^ Smith, Eldson Coles, New Dictionary of American Family Names New York, Harper & Row, 1956. Print
  2. ^ Arthur, William , An Etymological Dictionary of Family and Christian Names. London: 1857. Print
  3. ^ Hutchins, Fortescue, The History of Cornwall, from the Earliest Records and Traditions to the Present Time. London: William Penaluna, 1824. Print
  4. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  5. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  6. ^ Seary E.R., Family Names of the Island of Newfoundland, Montreal: McGill's-Queen's Universtity Press 1998 ISBN 0-7735-1782-0
  7. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 30th May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_australia_convicts.pdf
  8. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2014, November 24) Albion voyage to New South Wales, Australia in 1828 with 192 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/albion/1828
  9. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) SUSANNAH 1849. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1849Susannah.htm
  10. ^ Commemoration Empress of Ireland 2014. (Retrieved 2014, June 17) . Retrieved from http://www.empress2014.ca/seclangen/listepsc1.html
  11. ^ Halifax Explosion Book of Remembrance | Maritime Museum of the Atlantic. (Retrieved 2014, June 23) . Retrieved from https://maritimemuseum.novascotia.ca/what-see-do/halifax-explosion/halifax-explosion-book-remembrance
  12. ^ Pearl Harbour: USS Arizona Casualties List Pearl Harbour December 7, 1941. (Retrieved 2018, July 31st). Retrieved from http://pearl-harbor.com/arizona/casualtylist.html


Houseofnames.com on Facebook
Shipping
Fastest Delivery Possible

Digital Products on Checkout, all other products filled in 1 business day

Money Back
Money Back Guarantee

Yes, all products 100% Guaranteed

Support
BBB A+ Rating

The Best Rating possible

Payment
Secure Online Payment

Entire site uses SSL / Secure Certificate