Stapeldon History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Stapeldon name has descended through the generations from the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture. Their name comes from having lived in the village of Stapleton which could be found in the counties of Cumberland, Gloucestershire, Leicestershire, Somerset and Yorkshire. The surname Stapeldon is a habitation name that was originally derived from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads. The surname originated as a means of identifying individuals from a particular area. In the Middle Ages people often assumed the name of the place that they originally lived as their surname during the course of travel. In this case the surname Stapeldon was originally derived from the Old English terms which denoted a farm with a prominent pillar.

Early Origins of the Stapeldon family

The surname Stapeldon was first found in Yorkshire where they held a family seat from very ancient times, where tradition states that Octa, brother of Hengis, the Saxon invader, in the year 450, came north to defend his territory against the Picts, and established a fort on the banks of the Tees calling it Stapleton. In 1052, Heryon, was Lord of the manor of Stapleton upon Tees.

We draw the reader's attention to Saddleworth cum Quick in Yorkshire. "At the time of the Conquest, Saddleworth was constituted a manor; and in the year 1200, William de Stapleton, to whom it then belonged, founded a chapel here for his tenants, which he made subordinate to the church of St. Chad, Rochdale. From the Stapletons the portion of the manor called Friermere or Friar-Mere, which is in extent one-half of the chapelry." [1]

Walter de Stapeldon (1261-1326), was Bishop of Exeter, and virtual founder of Exeter College, Oxford, a younger son of William and Mabilla de Stapeldon, was born at Annery in the parish of Monkleigh, Devonshire.

Brian de Stapleton (1321?-1394), of Wighill, knight, was the second son of Sir Gilbert de Stapleton, and younger brother of Miles de Stapleton (d. 1364.)

"The manor of Carwythenack in the [parish of Constantine, Cornwall] belonged so early as the reign of Edward II. to the family of Stapleton." [2]

Sir Miles Stapleton, of Bedale, Yorkshire was Lord of Ingham, Norfolk by marriage in 1360 to Joanna, daughter and sole heiress of Sir Oliver de Ingham.

Early History of the Stapeldon family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Stapeldon research. Another 111 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1080, 1320, 1364, 1268, 1322, 1394, 1535, 1598, 1617, 1679, 1648, 1660, 1657, 1727, 1679, 1681, 1690, 1695, 1698, 1705, 1683, 1733, 1705, 1708 and 1669 are included under the topic Early Stapeldon History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Stapeldon Spelling Variations

Only recently has spelling become standardized in the English language. As the English language evolved in the Middle Ages, the spelling of names changed also. The name Stapeldon has undergone many spelling variations, including Stapylton, Stapleton, Stapulton, Stapilton, Stapledon and many more.

Early Notables of the Stapeldon family (pre 1700)

Notables of this surname at this time include: Sir Miles Stapleton of Bedale KG (1320?-1364), an English knight, one of the Knights Founder of the Order of the Garter who served in the Wars of Gascogne in 1268; Sir Bryan Stapleton KG (c.1322-1394), an English medieval knight from Yorkshire; Thomas Stapleton (1535-1598), an English Catholic controversialist from Sussex; Sir Henry Stapylton, 1st Baronet (c.1617-1679), an English politician who sat in...
Another 69 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Stapeldon Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Stapeldon family to Ireland

Some of the Stapeldon family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. More information about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Stapeldon family

To escape the unstable social climate in England of this time, many families boarded ships for the New World with the hope of finding land, opportunity, and greater religious and political freedom. Although the voyages were expensive, crowded, and difficult, those families that arrived often found greater opportunities and freedoms than they could have experienced at home. Many of those families went on to make significant contributions to the rapidly developing colonies in which they settled. Early North American records indicate many people bearing the name Stapeldon were among those contributors: Pierce Stapleton who settled in St. Christopher in 1635; Phillip Stapleton arrived in Boston Massachusetts in 1763; John and Mary Stapleton arrived in Boston in 1850 with their two children.



The Stapeldon Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Fide sed cui vide
Motto Translation: Trust, but in whom take care.


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Hutchins, Fortescue, The History of Cornwall, from the Earliest Records and Traditions to the Present Time. London: William Penaluna, 1824. Print


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