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St Jeint History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



St Jeint is an ancient Norman name that arrived in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. The name St Jeint comes from the saint bearing the ancient given name John. It is possible that individual cases may derive from the original bearer's residence in one of several places called St. Jean in Normandy that take their names from the same source. St Jeint is a classic example of an English polygenetic surname, which is a surname that was developed in a number of different locations and adopted by various families independently.


Early Origins of the St Jeint family


The surname St Jeint was first found in Oxfordshire where the family claim descent "from the great Domesday Baron Adam de Port, [who] took the name St John in the XII century on his marriage with the heiress of the powerful Norman family, so called." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.

John de Saint-John (died 1302), was "Lieutenant of Aquitaine, the son of Robert de Saint-John and his wife Agnes, daughter of William de Cantelupe. His grandfather, William de Saint-John, was the son of Adam de Port. Robert de Saint-John died in 1267, whereupon John received livery of his lands. John also succeeded his father as Ggovernor of Porchester Castle." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print

Stanton St. John in the union of Headington in Oxfordshire was home to the family. "This place takes the adjunct to its name from the family of St. John, who held the manor in the reign of Edward III." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Another branch of the family was found at Warnford in Southampton. "The manor, in the reign of William I., belonged to Hugh de Port, whose descendant, William, assumed the name of his maternal grandmother, St. John: the old manor-house, near the church, is now a ruin called King John's, by corruption of the family name." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

In the 17th century, "the family of St. John had a venerable mansion [in Battersea, Surrey], which was the favourite resort of Pope, who, when visiting his friend Lord Bolingbroke, usually selected as his study, in which he is said to have composed some of his celebrated works, a parlour wainscoted with cedar, overlooking the Thames." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Another branch of the family was found at Liddiard-Tregooze in Wiltshire. "This place has from the time of the Conquest been the property of the family of St. John, whose mansion and park are near the church." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


Early History of the St Jeint family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our St Jeint research.
Another 168 words (12 lines of text) covering the years 1096, 1085, 1582, 1596, 1540, 1618, 1598, 1673, 1640, 1653, 1634, 1711, 1663, 1685, 1678, 1751, 1749, 1714, 1559, 1630, 1589, 1577 and 1583 are included under the topic Early St Jeint History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

St Jeint Spelling Variations


Anglo-Norman names tend to be marked by an enormous number of spelling variations. This is largely due to the fact that Old and Middle English lacked any spelling rules when Norman French was introduced in the 11th century. The languages of the English courts at that time were French and Latin. These various languages mixed quite freely in the evolving social milieu. The final element of this mix is that medieval scribes spelled words according to their sounds rather than any definite rules, so a name was often spelled in as many different ways as the number of documents it appeared in. The name was spelled St. John, St. Jean, Singen and others.

Early Notables of the St Jeint family (pre 1700)


Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Oliver St John of Bletsoe, 1st Baron St John of Bletso (died 1582), an English peer, High Sheriff of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire; John St John, 2nd Baron St John of Bletso (d. 1596); Oliver St John, 3rd Baron St John of Bletso (c...
Another 113 words (8 lines of text) are included under the topic Early St Jeint Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the St Jeint family to Ireland


Some of the St Jeint family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 136 words (10 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the St Jeint family to the New World and Oceana


Because of the political and religious discontent in England, families began to migrate abroad in enormous numbers. Faced with persecution and starvation at home, the open frontiers and generally less oppressive social environment of the New World seemed tantalizing indeed to many English people. The trip was difficult, and not all made it unscathed, but many of those who did get to Canada and the United States made important contributions to the young nations in which they settled. Some of the first North American settlers with St Jeint name or one of its variants: Alpheus Spencer St. John who settled in Canada in 1835; John St. John who settled in Virginia in 1654; Thomas St. John who settled in Philadelphia in 1820.

The St Jeint Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Data fata secutus
Motto Translation: Following my destiny.


St Jeint Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  3. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


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