Slater History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The many generations and branches of the Slater family can all place the origins of their surname with the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture. Their name reveals that an early member worked as a person who covered roofs with slate. Slater is an occupational surname, which belongs to the category of hereditary surnames. Occupational surnames were derived from the primary activity of the bearer. In the Middle Ages, people did not generally live off of the fruits of their labor in a particular job. Rather, they performed a specialized task, as well as farming, for subsistence. Other occupational names were derived from an object associated with a particular activity. This type of surname is called a metonymic surname. This surname comes from the Old English word esclate, which means splinter or slat.

Early Origins of the Slater family

The surname Slater was first found in Derbyshire where the earliest records of the family were found at Barlborough near Chesterfield in Derbyshire.

As an occupational name, the family name was a trade name of a roofer and was originally spelled Sclater. This spelling is still used as far north as the Shetlands and the Orkney Islands, where their territories were in Burnes.

Early census records in Britain revealed Thomas le Sclatatere in Worcestershire in 1255 and Saundr le Sclattur in 1278 in Oxfordshire. [1] The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 list: Adam le Scatterre and Richard le Sclattere in Oxfordshire and Walter Sclatter in Buckinghamshire. [2]

"The living [of Tetsworth, Oxfordshire] is a vicarage, in the gift of the Slater family: the great tithes have been commuted for £210, and the small tithes for £115." [3] The Sclaters of Hoddington, claim to have borrowed their name from the parish of Slaughter, or Schlauter in Gloucestershire where they were lords of the manor of over three hundred years. [4]

Early History of the Slater family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Slater research. Another 77 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 1550, 1575, 1626, 1620, 1717, 1576, 1626, 1615, 1684, 1659, 1683, 1684, 1623, 1699, 1634, 1699, 1679, 1685, 1690, 1699, 1676 and 1667 are included under the topic Early Slater History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Slater Spelling Variations

Before the last few hundred years, the English language had no fast system of spelling rules. For that reason, spelling variations are commonly found in early Anglo-Saxon surnames. Over the years, many variations of the name Slater were recorded, including Sclater, Slater, Slatter, Sklater and others.

Early Notables of the Slater family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include William Sclater (1575-1626), rector of Pitminster, the second son of Anthony Sclater, of ancient Northumbrian descent, who is said to have held the benefice of Leighton Buzzard in Bedfordshire for fifty years, and to have died in 1620, aged 100. William Sclater (d. 1717?), was an English nonjuring divine, born at Exeter, the only son of William Sclater, rector of St. Peter-le-Poer, and grandson of William Sclater...
Another 73 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Slater Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Slater family to Ireland

Some of the Slater family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 34 words (2 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Slater migration to the United States +

To escape oppression and starvation at that time, many English families left for the "open frontiers" of the New World with all its perceived opportunities. In droves people migrated to the many British colonies, those in North America in particular, paying high rates for passages in cramped, unsafe ships. Although many of the settlers did not make the long passage alive, those who did see the shores of North America perceived great opportunities before them. Many of the families that came from England went on to make essential contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Research into various historical records revealed some of first members of the Slater family emigrate to North America:

Slater Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • John Slater, who settled in Virginia in 1617
  • John and Anne Slater who settled in Virginia in 1622
  • Anne Slater, who arrived in Virginia in 1622 [5]
  • Bartho Slater, who arrived in Maryland in 1637 [5]
  • Bartholomew Slater, who landed in Maryland in 1637 [5]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Slater Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Mary Slater, who landed in New York in 1705 [5]
  • Richard Slater, who arrived in Virginia in 1705 [5]
  • John Slater, who landed in America in 1760-1763 [5]
  • George Slater, who arrived in Boston, Massachusetts in 1764 [5]
  • James Slater, who landed in New York in 1798 [5]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Slater Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Joseph, Michael, Peter, Robert, Samuel, Simeon, Thomas, and William Slater, who arrived in Philadelphia between 1802 and 1868
  • Robert Slater, who landed in America in 1804 [5]
  • Pamther Slater, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1834 [5]
  • Christopher Slater, who landed in Missouri in 1840 [5]
  • G H Slater, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1851 [5]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Slater Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Katherine Slater, who landed in Colorado in 1903 [5]

Canada Slater migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Slater Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Abraham Slater, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • John Slater, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • Mary Slater, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • Richard Slater, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • Abraham Slater, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1775
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Slater Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Thomas Slater, aged 30, a shoemaker, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1834 aboard the brig "Lady Douglas" from New Ross
  • Mr. John Slater, aged 16 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Emigrant" departing 11th August 1847 from Liverpool, England; the ship arrived on 3rd October 1847 but he died on board [6]
  • Prokop Slater, aged 33, who arrived in Quebec in 1896

Australia Slater migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Slater Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • George Slater, English convict from Lincoln, who was transported aboard the "Asia" on October 22nd, 1824, settling in New South Wales, Australia [7]
  • William Slater, a shoemaker, who arrived in Van Diemen’s Land (now Tasmania) sometime between 1825 and 1832
  • Nicholas Slater, a shoemaker, who arrived in Van Diemen’s Land (now Tasmania) sometime between 1825 and 1832
  • John Slater, aged 28, who arrived in Holdfast Bay, Australia aboard the ship "Africaine" in 1836 [8]
  • Thomas Slater a farmer, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Winchester" in 1838 [9]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Slater migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Slater Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Barnard Slater, who landed in Nelson, New Zealand in 1842 aboard the ship Fifeshire
  • Mr. Slater, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Fairy Queen" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 9th July 1850 [10]
  • Mr. Francis Slater, (b. 1857), aged 1 year 3 months, English settler from Leicester travelling from Gravesend aboard the ship "Zealandia" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 21st September 1858 [11]
  • Mr. Daniel Slater, (b. 1826), aged 32, British carpenter and millwright travelling from Gravesend aboard the ship "Zealandia" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 21st September 1858 [11]
  • Mrs. Susannah Slater, (b. 1826), aged 32, English settler from Leicester travelling from Gravesend aboard the ship "Zealandia" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 21st September 1858 [11]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Slater (post 1700) +

  • Philip Slater, American actor, writer and sociologist
  • Matthew Slater (b. 1985), American professional football player
  • Lauren Slater (b. 1963), American psychologist and writer
  • Kelly Slater (b. 1972), American professional surfer
  • Helen Rachel Slater (b. 1963), American actress and singer-songwriter
  • Glenn Slater (b. 1968), American two-time Tony Award nominated lyricist
  • Frank O. Slater (b. 1920), American Naval reservist, posthumously awarded the Navy Cross, eponym of the USS Slater (DE-766)
  • Christian Michael Leonard Slater (b. 1969), American actor
  • Bill Slater (1902-1965), American educator, sports announcer, and radio/television personality
  • Samuel Slater (1768-1835), British-born, American textile pioneer, who oversaw the construction of America's first successful water-powered cotton mill
  • ... (Another 17 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

HMAS Sydney II
  • Mr. Alec George Hamilton Slater (1922-1941), Australian Assistant Cook from North Ringwood, Victoria, Australia, who sailed into battle aboard HMAS Sydney II and died in the sinking [12]
HMS Prince of Wales
HMS Repulse
  • Mr. Arthur Slater, British Petty Officer, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and survived the sinking [14]
  • Mr. Roland Slater, British Ordinary Signalman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and survived the sinking [14]
  • Mr. James Slater, British Leading Stoker, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and survived the sinking [14]
  • Mr. James Slater, British Chief Stoker, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and died in the sinking [14]
RMS Lusitania
  • Mr. Frank William Slater, American 2nd Class passenger from New York, New York, USA, who sailed aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking [15]


The Slater Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Crescit sub pondere virtus
Motto Translation: Virtue thrives under oppression.


Suggested Readings for the name Slater +

  • 962 The Slaters from St. Albans by Keith Slater.

  1. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  2. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  3. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  4. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  5. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  6. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 95)
  7. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2016, October 27) Asia 1 voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1824 with 9 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/asia/1824
  8. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) AFRICAINE 1836. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1836Africaine.htm
  9. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) WINCHESTER 1838. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1838Winchester.htm
  10. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  11. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  12. ^ HMAS Sydney II, Finding Sydney Foundation - Roll of Honour. (Retrieved 2014, April 24) . Retrieved from http://www.findingsydney.com/roll.asp
  13. ^ HMS Prince of Wales Crew members. (Retrieved 2014, April 9) . Retrieved from http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listprincecrew.html
  14. ^ HMS Repulse Crew members. (Retrieved 2014, April 9) . Retrieved from http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listrepulsecrew.html
  15. ^ Lusitania Passenger List - The Lusitania Resource. (Retrieved 2014, March 6) . Retrieved from http://www.rmslusitania.info/lusitania-passenger-list/


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