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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


Simpston is an ancient Anglo-Saxon surname that came from the baptismal name Simon, which was originally derived from the Hebrew word Shimeon meaning obedience. In the religious naming tradition surnames were bestowed in honor of religious figures or church officials. In Europe, the Christian Church was one of the most powerful influences on the formation of given names. Personal names derived from the names of saints, apostles, biblical figures, and missionaries are widespread in most European countries. In the Middle Ages, they became increasingly popular because people believed that the souls of the deceased continued to be involved in this world. They named their children after saints in the hope that the child would be blessed or protected by the saint.

Simpston Early Origins



The surname Simpston was first found in Buckinghamshire where Simpson was listed in the Domesday Book as Sevinstone or Siwinestone, lands held by the Bishop of Countances. The place literally meant "farmstead of a man called Sigewine" derived from the Old Scandinavian personal name + tun. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
At the time, the land consisted of 8 hides (each hide would support one household), 3 virgates (three quarters of a hide) and land enough to support 8 ploughs. There were 13 villans (peasants), 2 bordars and 6 slaves [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
. Today Simpson is a village and civil parish in Milton Keynes and had a population of 585 people in the late 1800s. Another source has a different understanding of the name's origin. "The Simpsons of Knaresborough trace their lineage from the time of Edward the Confessor, and from Archill, a Saxon thane, living in that reign of the Conqueror. Among his vast possessions was the manor of Clint in Yorkshire. The name of Simpson was adopted from Symon, son of William de Clynt who was living in the year 1300. " [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.

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Simpston Spelling Variations


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Simpston Spelling Variations



The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries; therefore, spelling variations are common among early Anglo-Saxon names. As the form of the English language changed, even the spelling of literate people's names evolved. Simpston has been recorded under many different variations, including Simpson, Simson, Simsoun, Symson, Symsoun and many more.

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Simpston Early History


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Simpston Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Simpston research. Another 341 words (24 lines of text) covering the years 1050, 1405, 1500, 1600, 1655, 1602, 1669 and are included under the topic Early Simpston History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Simpston Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Simpston Early Notables (pre 1700)



Another 43 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Simpston Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Simpston In Ireland


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Simpston In Ireland



Some of the Simpston family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 101 words (7 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



For many English families, the political and religious disarray that shrouded England made the far away New World an attractive prospect. On cramped disease-ridden ships, thousands migrated to those British colonies that would eventually become Canada and the United States. Those hardy settlers that survived the journey often went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Simpston or a variant listed above: Henry Simpson who settled in Maine in 1635; John and Joe Simpson settled in Boston in 1635; Robert Simpson settled in Maryland in 1633; another Robert Simpson settled in Salem in 1630.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Nil desperandum
Motto Translation: Never despairing.


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Simpston Family Crest Products


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Simpston Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  3. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.

Other References

  1. Marcharn, Frederick George. A Constitutional History of Modern England 1485 to the Present. London: Harper and Brothers, 1960. Print.
  2. The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X).
  3. Crispin, M. Jackson and Leonce Mary. Falaise Roll Recording Prominent Companions of William Duke of Normandy at the Conquest of England. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  4. Hitching, F.K and S. Hitching. References to English Surnames in 1601-1602. Walton On Thames: 1910. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0181-3).
  5. Shirley, Evelyn Philip. Noble and Gentle Men of England Or Notes Touching The Arms and Descendants of the Ancient Knightley and Gentle Houses of England Arranged in their Respective Counties 3rd Edition. Westminster: John Bowyer Nichols and Sons, 1866. Print.
  6. Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds. Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8).
  7. Hanks, Hodges, Mills and Room. The Oxford Names Companion. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002. Print. (ISBN 0-19-860561-7).
  8. Innes, Thomas and Learney. The Tartans of the Clans and Families of Scotland 1st Edition. Edinburgh: W & A. K. Johnston Limited, 1938. Print.
  9. Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin . Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8).
  10. Burke, Sir Bernard. General Armory Of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales. Ramsbury: Heraldry Today. Print.
  11. ...

The Simpston Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Simpston Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 18 December 2015 at 12:33.

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